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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  February 13, 2019 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2: theresa may faces the threat of another defeat in parliament on her brexit deal, as tory pro—brexit mps threaten to revolt. we cannot vote for this, as it is currently configured, because it rolls out no deal and removes our negotiating leveraging brussels. lower energy and fuel bills lead to a fall in inflation. it was at 1.8% last month — its lowest level for two years. police say the deaths of three men in their 80s in exeter are linked — a man's been arrested on suspicion of murder. the home secretary tells the bbc he wants a crackdown on social media companies, which carry content that fuels knife crime. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — john watson. he has been called the best young
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player in german football, tottenham will see the extent of his talents in the champions league tonight. thanks, john, and nick has all the weather. thanks, nick. the sun is coming out and temperatures are going up. spring is in the f but i also have news of snow—white you don't normally see eight and snow—white you don't normally see eightand a snow—white you don't normally see eight and a rather unusual use for a lawn mower. thanks, nick. also coming up, the plight of the pangolin. they're the only mammals in the world to be covered in protective scales, but they are used in chinese medicines, which makes the pangolin the most widely trafficked mammal in the world. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. theresa may has insisted she wants the uk to leave the european union with a deal on the 29th march. it follows a report her lead brexit negotiator was overheard by an itv journalist, suggesting there could be a significant delay if mps rejected her deal.
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today it also emerged an influential group of tory backbenchers who support brexit are threatening not to vote with the government in the commons tomorrow, amid reports they fear the government's motion could be used to prevent a no—deal departure from the eu. our political correspondent nick eardley has more. what is on theresa may's mind? what will she do if she can't get her plan through parliament? at the moment, things around westminster are on hold as the government seeks changes over the irish border but with brexit just over six weeks away... questions to the prime minister! some are worried the government is simply running down the clock. the prime minister must stop playing fast and loose. businesses are begging for certainty. the economy is already suffering. prime minister, you have come to the end of the road. he can give businesses certainty by voting for the deal. that is what gives business certainty. but could an overheard conversation in this brussels bar give
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a hint about strategy? itv news reports the pm's chief negotiator, ollie robbins, said the government might have to seek a significant delay to brexit day if it cannot get a new deal through parliament in the next few weeks. notwithstanding brussels barroom chatter, will the prime minister rule out a delay of brexit beyond march the 29th? it is very clear, the government's position is the same. we triggered article 50. in fact, this house voted to trigger article 50. that had a two—year timeline that ends on the 29th of march. we want to leave with a deal and that is what we are working for. tomorrow mps will hold a series of votes. there won't be a new deal on offer, but even endorsing what has already been backed by parliament isn't easy. tory brexiteers might not back the government. we cannot vote for this as it is currently configured because it rules out no deal and removes our negotiating leverage in brussels. if the prime minister went
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through the lobbies for this tomorrow night would be voting against the guarantee she has given in the commons for months. it is madness. it is a sign of how fragile truce in the conservative party is. without the backing of brexiteers, theresa may's majority is extremely vulnerable. a defeat tomorrow would only be symbolic but it would show once again just how volatile westminster is. so, it goes on. delicate conversations both home and abroad. the brexit debate is farfrom over, but leaving day gets ever closer. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. 0ur chief political correspondent, vicki young, is at westminster. tomorrow was sort of being written down as something not very eventful. that seems to have changed. down as something not very eventful. that seems to have changedlj down as something not very eventful. that seems to have changed. i think it does depend whether people feel there are any large numbers to
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either vote this down or to vote through any of the amendments because people are making moves... the idea mps should have a chance to vote on what they might want instead of theresa may's deal. there is not much optimism from those people that they can get it through parliament. the question is whether a group of tory mps will decide to vote against the motion. you are part of the grouping uncomfortable with some bits of theirs. what is it you are unhappy about in the government's motion? the vote tomorrow is not a meaningful vote and it reallyjust confirms the vote was how they feel days ago in parliament. there is concern that we don't want to give an impression that no deal is off the table because the prime minister has confirmed that is not the case. some have concerns about the wording that might give that impression. tomorrow's vote is not the meaningful vote. i think there is a
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lot of significance put on tomorrow but actually what is important is the vote coming once the primary star has finished her negotiations with the yield. many of us want to see an exit mechanism in the deal or a time limit to the backstop because currently as it is, our big concern is we could not accept the backstop, should we ever need to enter it. would you be happy with some kind of legal clarification alongside the withdrawal agreement or are you still saying it has got to be in the actual withdrawal agreement?‘ numberof actual withdrawal agreement?‘ number of colleagues who support leave have compromised significantly. leave have compromised significa ntly. we leave have compromised significantly. we have compromised oi'i significantly. we have compromised on the funding, we have compromised oi'i on the funding, we have compromised on the funding, we have compromised on the backstop, mainly to stay, but it has to be amended. just adding a coder seal or a letter as an addendum is not enough. there has to bea addendum is not enough. there has to be a change in that treaty. either it has an end date for the backstop oran it has an end date for the backstop or an exit mechanism. we will not acce pt or an exit mechanism. we will not accept anything less than that. what about reports that 0llie robbins, the senior negotiating on the team
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was overheard saying the choice in the end will be theresa may's deal oi’ the end will be theresa may's deal ora the end will be theresa may's deal or a long delayed brexit. do you think that is the choice? now, if you look at what is in law, we are leaving the eu on the 29th of march, where a deal without a deal. the legal position that we have in this country right now unless legislation comes forward to change that which is unlikely in the time that is left before we leave is that we leave on the 29th of march and we leave whether there is a deal in place or not. the decision for parliament is the primary step's deal or no deal. but you know there are moves amongst mps from all sides to prevent a no deal, to try and force the government and if it came to that. aren't you concerned that they would have a majority to stop that happening? they may win votes but the law of the land is we are leaving on the 29th of march and if there is no deal in place, we go on wto terms. that is the law of the land. to change that would require
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primary legislation and that is not gone to happen. parliament may express that wish but by voting through the withdrawal act last year they actually set the date and weather without ideal we are living oi'i weather without ideal we are living on the 29th of march. are you concerned this looks like it is going to the wire? theresa may is effectively delaying by another two weeks and effectively longer before that crucial meaningful vote, the only one that matters? we know from the history of the eu that they do make decisions on the 11th hour. it is notjust the prime minister taking this to the wire, brussels are currently saying there is no change possible. they are leaving it to the 11th hour also. that does risk a no deal. most of us want to see a deal on the table, when we cannot get around, the best outcome for everyone, but as it stands at the moment, unless someone blinks, it is going to be a no deal except oi'i it is going to be a no deal except on the 29th of march. others are saying if that were the case or even ifa saying if that were the case or even if a deal goes through, in order to get the legislation through, there
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is going to have to be an extension to article 50. may be a short delay may be a much longer one. is there regional concern amongst those of you that have campaigned for brexit for a very long time that you could be risking that? ice ignition and amount of work has been done to pass legislation already that underpins out legislation already that underpins our withdrawal from the year. that is why we are not having a recess next week. we have crunched through the legislation to get it through. there is confidence that the legislation that has to be done by the 29th of march will be done, there will be plenty of legislation after that that also needs to come forward. thank you very much indeed. we will have to wait and seeing if the government rewrites that motion in order to keep more of its mps on the side. inflation has fallen to its lowest level in two years. the consumer prices index, which tracks changes in the cost of living, stood at 1.8% last month, compared with 2.1% in december. economists say the fall is partly due to cuts to energy and petrol prices.
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it means pay rises are now outpacing inflation, which as our economics correspondent andy verity explains, means many people may feel their incomes now go a little further. we are used to inflation prices fuelling inflation. the energy price cap played its part but so did cheaper crude oil. that has helped consumers such as melanie gee and jason sharples in bolton. as a sales executive, jason has seen his wages rise faster than prices for five years. other elements of the cost of living are getting more manageable and not less. petrol is cheaper than it was. it is still expensive and as a country we are charging too much for fuel, but petrol, i would say. i cannot think of much more that has gone a lot cheaper. certain foods.
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between december and january, gas bills fell by an average of 8.5% and electricity bills dropped by 4.9%. some of those bills may rise again in april, but for now they have helped give households a little more spending power. by seeing the real wage growth coming through with nine continuous months of increases in real wages and the last figure for a real wage increase being the highest rate of increase in the last ten years. pay rises have left behind house prices but now wages are rising faster. the weaker demand from around the world doesn'tjust mean cheaper bills, it's also a sign of something else. the latest economic figures, the gdp numbers we had in the week, suggests the economy is in a softer patch. economic momentum has slowed. if it continues we could see a weakening in the labour market and that might put downward pressure on employment and it might lead to a downward pressure on pay grades. cheaper oil may have drug bills down
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and helped lift living standards but it is a by—product of the global, economic slowdown. the silver lining of better living standards is accompanied by a big, grey cloud. we're used to energy placed —— prices fuelling inflation. the police and the public are being exposed to increased risk, because more frontline police officers are having to work alone. that's the warning from the police federation, which represents officers in england and wales. more than three—quarters of frontline officers who responded to a survey said they were "often or always" on duty by themselves. it was also found that most had experienced stress and anxiety during the past year. jon donnison reports. officers on a raid in sheffield, targeting organised crime. police work is often stressful, dangerous and traumatic. pc daniel gaunt developed ptsd after joining the police aged just 23. i'd had 23 years of life where nothing really
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traumatic had happened. and then in a very small space of time i'd been exposed to things i didn't even know existed, let alone that i would have to deal with. today's survey says he is not alone. 79% of officers say they have had feelings of stress and anxiety in the past year. 62% say they have had a traumatic experience in the last 12 months. and 90% say the police are understaffed. that increasingly means officers are having to work on their own. pc mickjohnson was stabbed in the arm after confronting a man with a knife in hartlepool in 2017. he too has ptsd. he was working alone. we are more on our owfi during the daytime, certainly.
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and occasionally on nights due to the lack of staff. that is the be all and end of it. if there is enough of us to be double crewed on night shifts, we are double crewed. if there isn't, one of us will be single crewed. we have seen sustained cuts to policing. 18% of the workforce is gone. and we have the same level of demand, if not more, for certain types of crime. and a reduced pot of officers to deal with that. the only way you can make ends meet is putting officers out on their own, trying to deal with the 999 calls. police! the number of police officers in england and wales has fallen by more than 20,000 since 2010. but in a statement, the government said it took the well—being of police officers and staff very seriously... police! ..and have invested £7.5 million in a new police well—being service. jon donnison, bbc news. you're watching afternoon live.
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these are our headlines: theresa may faces the threat of another defeat in parliament on her brexit deal tomorrow, as tory pro—brexit mps threaten to revolt. lower energy and fuel bills lead to a fall in inflation. it was at 1.8% last month — its lowest level for two years. police say the deaths of three men in their 80s in exeter are linked. a man's been arrested on suspicion of murder. and in sport, jayden sancho has been labelled the best young player in german football, heading into the match with tottenham in the last 16 of the champions league tonight. there has been a six—day suspension of racing following the equine flu outbreak. racegoers have been offered free entry. and the biggest first prize in golf will be on open —— on offering the tour this year. i
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will be back with more on all those stories at around half past. horse racing tracks are gearing up for their first meets in six days, after an outbreak of equine flu caused a uk—wide suspension. strict measures are in place to try to stop any further chance of the disease spreading. the decision to resume meetings has been welcomed by the industry and race—goers alike. 0ur sports news correspondent richard conway is at plumpton racecourse in east sussex. i think they have just had the first race, haven't they? they have, ac milan winning the first race at plympton this afternoon. the first of six races, racing officially back and that is something i think the industry as a whole is... there is a sense of relief. a six—day stoppage due to this equine flu outbreak and they have got back to doing what they do best and that is putting on
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racehorses and meetings like this. and yet there must be some nervousness because we are talking about a virus that by no means at the moment seems to be under control, if you like. yes, and we have seen this morning, simon, on arrival, the british horse racing authority have put in place a series of bio—security measures because they feel they want to contain, control this virus as best as possible but still put race meetings on and allow racing to continue. 0n arrival, we have seen trainers having to show documentation that their horses have up—to—date vaccinations, no horses that have not had vaccinations over the past six months are allowed onto the course itself. we have seen vets taking the temperature of horses, making sure that they are showing all healthy signs and of course, they have also categorised trainers by risk, so that means that some trainers are still not allowed to field horses. lucinda russell for
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example by virtue of the fact that she has not got her vaccinations up to date, she will be fielding her horse at haydock this weekend as she had planned. racing is returning, it is not fully there yet. at the meetings are back on. the authority feels they are comfortable to get racing back under way. feels they are comfortable to get racing back under waylj feels they are comfortable to get racing back under way. i had been thinking of asking you if you had taken any bets. i thought i would dress for the past this afternoon. you never know. we have been talking to the bookies this afternoon. yes, they have had a six—day suspension. this industry is about people who are largely self—employed, the jockeys, lots about people who are largely self—employed, thejockeys, lots of the bookmakers who don't work for the bookmakers who don't work for the big firms, there is no racing, there is no income. six days is fine in february because sometimes they are going to lose business because
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of bad weather at this time of year. anything longer than that and that was the worry last week, they did not know how long the suspension would be in place, that was going to cause them consent. a sense of relief is quite palpable. they are taking some cash once again and we will see if they are happy at the end of the day. thank you very much. talk to you later. social media companies should be made to take more responsiblity for cracking down on content that's fuelling knife crime, the home secretary has told the bbc. sajid javid says he wants measures to ensure technology firms clampdown on gang—related material, in the same way they have targeted terrorist propaganda. newsbeat‘sjim connolly reports. police siren more people are being killed in england and wales by knives now that at any time since the second world war. rob was in a gang in east london but moved away to escape his violent past. he spent six years in prison, but now goes around schools and colleges to try to stop others making the same mistakes. i started carrying a knife when i was 12. a knife
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because everyone was doing it at the time. i wanted to fit in. i stabbed quite a lot of people. and if i was to sit here and count, i wouldn't be able to count, because there was so much years i was in the gang life, and people remind me to this day about people i stabbed i didn't remember, you know? that's the gods honest truth. the first person to be killed by a knife this year died on this street in the early hours of new year's day. knife crime is becoming a grim daily reality. and the government knows it needs to do something about it. just down the road at kings college hospital, the home secretary has come to see where victims end up. one of the ways he wants to stop people getting to this point is by restricting content that incites violence, like some drill music, a genre of highly aggressive rap often linked to street violence. i actually think you can do a lot more to police harmful content on the internet. at the moment we don't have that legislation for it. i have this legislation for terrorist content, i have it for illegal child sexual abuse imagery, but we don't have that legislation today for that kind of content. and we're changing that.
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as a parent, i want my children to be able to walk around on any street and just feel that they are safe and that's why a lot more needs to be done. life is looking brighter for robert. but many people he grew up with are trapped in a gang lifestyle. back in my day, if i listened to drill music, i'm riding out 21w. like, if i was listening to drill music every day, the way it is now, i'm definitely committing crime. it's not helping. they're doing acts of people dipping and stabbing each other. that's not... that's glamorising and that's wrong. preventing more getting involved is the new priority for the authorities. jim connolly, bbc news. we can speak now to blaen roberts, the founder of liver pedlaa pool, an organisation that helps to steer youths away from criminal activity, gang culture and knife crime through cycling activities and workshops. good to talk to you. ijust good to talk to you. i just wonder
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how much of the problem is down to social media. you tell me. how much of the problem is down to social media. you tell melj how much of the problem is down to social media. you tell me. i think social media. you tell me. i think social media. you tell me. i think social media can be a big part of it because it is glamorising that lifestyle and that can culture and thatis lifestyle and that can culture and that is what you need to target before you target knife crime. you need to target why these lads are getting into this lifestyle, why they are getting into the gang culture, because it is hard to get out of it once you get into it. but you need to prevent these knife crimes and might crime incidents and tragedies before they actually happen and take place because i believe the police cannot arrest their way out of this problem. it has to be solved at the root source, targeting this can culture and lifestyle. you talk about glamorising it through social media, how many people are being introduced, being brought into that gang culture, because of what they have seen on social media? there is not a lot of opportunities for these lads, so they are going to the streets and this gang lifestyle, this can culture, it is appealing to
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them, making money is appealing to them. and it is easy for them to get into the wrong crowd and get roped into the wrong crowd and get roped into that lifestyle. and what i am doing in liverpool is giving them opportunities to get away from that lifestyle and create a healthy lifestyle and create a healthy lifestyle and create a healthy lifestyle and that is what we are doing here. we have set up the first mountain bike team and we are competing across the uk this year. we are giving lads opportunities, videographers, photographers, it is about giving them a new path in life and new opportunities and a whole new lifestyle to get them away from the gang culture and mainly the knife crime epidemic that is in the uk. how much of the problem here is because, what you offer is a chance for younger people a chance to get into another postcode, how big a deal is that? i know it sounds silly but that is an issue, isn't it? of course. when i set it up, the aim was to break the postcode barriers. that has never been done before. and
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postcode barriers, a lot of the knife crime issues and a lot of it stems from postcodes and so getting the lads and the youth away from their own postal schools, into new postcodes, into the big city, liverpool, and even the bigger country that the uk is, getting there out of their postcode is a big thing and it is a big way of preventing such crimes from taking place in the future. some people you are dealing with on a daily basis, they have never known any other culture. how do you change their lives? that is what the aim is. some of these lads come from all kinds of backgrounds and they might not have father figures and what we are doing is we are creating a family and a community for them to be a part of and to feel likely are doing something positive and it is making a huge impact on these youths' lives in liverpool already. the instagram has blown up. i have been doing it for eight months and already i have
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seen a lot of impact. i do a lot of intervention and i meant all a lot of these kids. ifi said intervention and i meant all a lot of these kids. if i said to you five or ten years ago, you would be a father figure, you would or ten years ago, you would be a fatherfigure, you would have probably laughed at me. of course. i had a bit of a problem in the past. and that is just stemming from a lack of opportunities. a lack of jobs and especially in liverpool, the street life, it is a thing that is so easy to get roped into. do you think there is an issue here for my generation, for people like me, who need to understand what is going on rather than saying, you just need to put down the knives and move on? you can't just tell them to put down the knives and move on? you can'tjust tell them to put down the knives without giving the dash then the opportunities and the lifestyle change that i have been talking about. it effects yourself because we should not be opening the newspapers and listening to the news just to another child being dead. it
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is too late. it is too soon. the police cannot tackle it. you have to tackle it before these crimes happen and so yes, i think it does affect all of us in the uk. as anybody said thank you to you lately?” all of us in the uk. as anybody said thank you to you lately? i do get a lot of support, a lot of families andi lot of support, a lot of families and i am dealing with a lot of families who are coming to for help to intervene. yes, i do get a lot of thanks. thank you. a man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after three men in their 80s — two of whom were believed to be twins, were found dead in exeter. devon and cornwall police have confirmed they are linking the deaths, which they described as ‘an unprecedented event.‘ 0ur correspondent sarah ransome joins us now from exeter. what do we know so far? details are
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gradually emerging. this has overnight become an extraordinary story. the police themselves are calling it an unprecedented event. they are now investing what they now call multiple murders in exeter, a quiet cathedral city, if you like, in the heart of devon. and what they have said this lunchtime is that they are linking the murders. they have now formally link them. the way they have linked them because of the injuries that the three people sustained. they are saying that is the link to it. they say they were all found within their own properties, one man, an 80—year—old man was found in his own house on monday. the police were called to another house about a mile or so away from that original property, down by the railway station, they we re down by the railway station, they were called to another house where they found two more people, two gentlemen who were 84 years old. they had been named locally as dick and richard carter. they are residents in that area —— the
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residents in that area —— the residents in that area —— the residents in that area have said they were twins. all the men in both locations we understand cap themselves very much to themselves and they were very private but the police this lunchtime have not been able to give much more information really relating to their investigation because they have arrested a 27—year—old man in connection with the three murders. they say they are keeping an open mind. they have asked for more people to come forward with information that they may have seen something happen, in the area, but asi something happen, in the area, but as i say at the moment they are calling it an unprecedented event really in the city. they have committed dozens and dozens of officers to try and get to grips with what they are calling a fast—moving investigation. time for a look at the weather. nick miller. no one will guess where that snow is. it is how eiffel. it
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is incredible. you have to go a long way up into the mountains in hawaii, where it does snow every winter but this is not that higher. it is the spring recreational area. this is just at the weekend, there was a big storm that went through. the elevation is just under 2000 metres full no one can exactly say whether this is the first time they have had snow this low in hawaii. no one can remember it being the case before. it is probably the only time it has been videoed. you have to go a long time back to find snow at such a low of —— low elevation. a long time back to find snow at such a low of -- low elevation. but you don't have to worry about mowing the lawn. you can put into use doing something else. i did give a hint earlier. what are you expecting to see when we about lawn mowers? ijust want what are you expecting to see when we about lawn mowers? i just want to lower your expectations. it is
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difficult on this programme to lower expectations! if this is good enough for darren bent, it is good enough for me! they are off. this is finland, this is the 12 hour endurance lawn mower on the 12 hour endurance lawn mower on theice the 12 hour endurance lawn mower on the ice race. yes, they have fun with this. notice how it is actually quite slushy and quite wet. it is actually raining in this. you can see the paddles. they had to stop early. in fact, see the paddles. they had to stop early. infact, simon, they did not get to finish. finland? yes, you lost me i feel minutes ago. fabulous. let's find out about closer to home. things are warming up. this will never catch on. air
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coming up from the south, warmer colours coming our way and more sunshine over the next couple of days. we still have some cloud out there at the moment. there's a bit of sunshine around the marie firth. lots of wales and the midlands, east anglia, seeing the lion's share of the sunny spells. quite breezy out there. gusts around 50 mph also. most there. gusts around 50 mph also. m ost pla ces there. gusts around 50 mph also. most places dry and temperatures are in double figures. they are about to go in double figures. they are about to 9° up in double figures. they are about to goupa in double figures. they are about to go up a little more as we bring in more sunshine over the next couple of days. that said, still a chilly night to come tonight. especially through parts of englund and wales where the wins are light down towards the south—east of england. may a feeling they and fog patches. temperatures falling in some spots. under the cloud it is really quite mild. italy and the western isles. we are still bringing this error
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from the south tomorrow but it is somewhat drier and there is less in the way of cloud around. plenty of sunshine across englund and wales start the day. the crowd will have in scotland and northern ireland more sunny spells as we go through the day. i notice any early raining northern scotland players and some improving picture and the temperatures are in a degree also higher compared with today. of course it will feel better in the sunshine. the wind is not as strong. looking ahead to friday, notice there is plenty of sunshine around to start the day. there is a bit more cloud starting to drift in to the west of northern ireland and north—west scotland. this is a weak weather coming back. 0utbrea ks north—west scotland. this is a weak weather coming back. outbreaks of rain possible. a little bit breezy. it'll be quite windy over the next couple of days for even though it will be quite mild. maybe as high as 16 degrees for the top temperature. we could see that in parts of northern scotland on friday for example. this is a look at the
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weekend to cancel the baby more cloud to come on saturday. patchy rain in places. temperatures are still remaining above average for the time of year. this is bbc news. feeling a bit blue! i will have the headlines and the sport in a moment. theresa may faces the threat of another defeat in parliament on her brexit deal tomorrow as tory pro—brexit mps threaten to revolt. we cannot vote for this, as it is currently configured, because it rules out no deal and removes our negotiating leverage in brussels. lower energy and fuel bills lead to a fall in inflation. it was at 1.8% last month — its lowest level for two years.
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police say the deaths of three men in their 80s in exeter, two of whom were believed to be twins, are linked. a man's been arrested on suspicion of murder. it is with some relief i can see you there, john! tottenham face dortmund later in the champions league and it's a young englishman who could pose the biggest threat to spurs? it could be, a player with a huge reputation, 18—year—old jadon sancho who has been labelled the best young player in german football since joining the russier dortmund and he will play in their champions league fixture against tottenham. steffen freund, who played for both clubs, has made the claim. he moved from manchester city to germany to boost his playing opportunities and he has
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dazzled in the top flight there and has been called up to the england squad. his team—mates are all too aware of his growing reputation. squad. his team—mates are all too aware of his growing reputationlj aware of his growing reputation.” feel a bit responsible, or responsibility for keeping him on the ground. but now we are here in england, world famous for hyping your young players! we try to keep him on the ground because no doubt he has a big future in front of him. he does indeed and spurs will be keeping a close eye on him. they are without a couple of their stars, harry kane and dele alli was out. it is one of two champions league fixtures tonight. some cricket but more what is happening off the pitch rather than on it. joe root getting praise for a reaction to some comments from the opposition. not too many highlights in this series but the way thatjoe root handle comment has been praised by many. he
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was overheard replying to shannon gabriel saying it is ok to be gay. as you can imagine, as a role model in his position as captain of the test match team, there has been plenty of praise about the way he responded to what went on in the middle. i think it sums up how far sport has moved but also for him, he has shown real characteristics of leadership and being a role model in that scenario, to stand up for what he believes in. we don't know what shannon gabriel said but forjoe root, he has shown a positive line. the details about hearing should be coming through today. as we have heard as well, has resumed after a suspension of six days following the equine flu outbreak. a free entry has been awarded at musselburgh, this was the first race of the day at plumpton. trainers and staff have had to follow strict criteria as the british horseracing authority looks to limit the spread further. more on
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that throughout the day. england have released joe cokanasiga and dan robson back to their clubs to play this weekend, both of whom are recovering from injury and have been given the chance to play in what is a rest weekend in the six nations. head coach eddie jones a rest weekend in the six nations. head coach eddiejones has named a training squad of 25 that will meet for a three—day camp ahead of the next match, against wales. the biggest first prize in golf will be on offer on the european tour this year with the winner of the season ending world tour championship earning £2.3 million. 0rganisers hope the increase in money up for grabs will encourage the world's best to play more events on the european tour. justin rose missed the event last year as he stood no chance of overhauling tommy fleetwood and francesco molinari in the race to dubai title. there could bea the race to dubai title. there could be a big shock at the welsh open snooker. masters champion judd be a big shock at the welsh open snooker. masters championjudd trump is 3—0 down to world number 72 duane
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jones in their second round match in cardiff. trump has been the form player this year but has struggled so far against his welsh opponent. it is the first to four frames. that is all from bbc sport for now, plenty more in the next hour. thank you. it once held vast swathes of territory in syria and iraq, but now the so—called islamic state group's last few hundred fighters are confined to a handful of tiny enclaves. around the town of baghuz in syria, they're surrounded by the us—backed coalition, who've launched what they've called the final battle against the militants. richard galpin reports on what's expected to be the imminent fall of islamic state's last significant bit of land. these us—backed fighters are now poised for victory over so—called islamic state here in eastern syria. since the weekend, civilians have been pouring out of the last tiny sliver of territory still held by the militants in the country.
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and, with most civilians now having left, the offensive which began on saturday can now be wrapped up. 0n the ground, syrian democratic forces are battling about 500 or 600 experienced islamic state fighters who are making a last stand. translation: there are two factors that have a direct impact on this battle. one, the terrorists there are the finest fighters from different nationalities including europeans, afghans, pakistanis and iraqis. they are all professionals who have past experience in other terrorist groups including al-qaeda, and they are also defending their last position. but the united states air force is also playing a key role, bombing what is left of the militants' territory, and that is reportedlyjust two streets in one small hamlet called baghuz.
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at its peak about four years ago, islamic state held swathes of territory in syria and iraq but this has diminished as us coalition and russian—backed forces have hit back at the militants in a sustained campaign. the caliphate has now shrunk to just the tiny enclave of baghuz. the isis leader, abu bakr al—baghdadi, here announcing the creation of the caliphate in 2014, is reported to have been seen in the baghuz area several months ago before apparently moving into the desert. for the civilians who managed to get away from the fighting in baghuz, there will be relief they are safe. but this is not the last gasp of islamic state. it remains a threat, with cells in many countries still capable of carrying out attacks. richard galpin, bbc news. pangolins are protected by international wildlife laws
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but they remain the most trafficked group of mammals in the world. conservationists from chester zoo are conducting the first ever study of the giant pangolin sub—species. rare footage has now been captured, as helen briggs reports. a rare glimpse of the secret life of the mysterious giant pangolin. baby clings to mum on a ride through the forest, and a grown—up tries to climb a tree. when scientists from chester zoo studied pangolins in the forests of uganda, they were amazed to see what happens after dark. and they say the race is on to protect the most trafficked animal on earth. illegally hunted for their meat and scales, smuggling is on the rise. there have been tons of pangolin scales intercepted recently, including this haul confiscated in uganda. and wildlife experts say we may have lost a million pangolins
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from the wild in the past ten years alone. pangolins are solitary, nocturnal, they're quite elusive, often found in dense forests and historically we haven't known a huge amount about them. however, what we do know is that they are being traded really heavily, that all its species are vulnerable and threatened with extinction, and if we don't take action soon, that we could lose them. for the giant pangolin of uganda, this is one place they can't be poached. protecting rhinos around—the—clock is keeping these mysterious scaly mammals safe, too. and its opening up a completely new window into their behaviour in the wild. helen briggs, bbc news. we can now speak to paul de 0rnellas who is the chief wildlife advisor for world wildlife fund. it is interesting seeing these pictures because this is a mammal we know so little about. indeed, many
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people have never even heard of pangolins. they look like little dinosaurs as you saw, a scaly anteater, the only mammal with scales but still something we know relatively little about but what we do know is that they are being massively hit by the illegal wildlife trade. and that is because of the scales because they contain something useful in chinese medicine? it is partly because of that and partly their flesh. the scales themselves are made up of the same sort of thing, keratin, that we have in ourfingernails same sort of thing, keratin, that we have in our fingernails and same sort of thing, keratin, that we have in ourfingernails and hair and that make up a rhino horn and there isa that make up a rhino horn and there is a belief in traditional chinese medicine that products made from these scales have certain beneficial effects. there is no actual evidence for that and certainly that is one of the reasons that they are hunted. so, what can be done? when you look
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at the main driver of this trade, it is asa at the main driver of this trade, it is as a luxury meat or traditional chinese medicine it is a question of looking at that demand primarily. 0rganisations like wwf and traffic are looking at ways in which we can influence demand, taking action to change consumer behaviour to try to nip in the bud the original driver of the trade. at the same time, we do need to be looking at law enforcement. wherever pangolins are, there is some degree of protection but we have to ensure those laws are effectively applied. their natural defence as i understand it like hedgehogs, they roll up into a ball? they do indeed. it is one of those very poignant and sad thing is to seek this well evolved adaptation, curling up into a ball with your
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scales around you, it is very good if you're trying to defend yourself against a leopard but not so much against a leopard but not so much against a leopard but not so much against a person also with means you are easy to pick up and transport fresh. not a great adaptation for the modern world unfortunately. fresh. not a great adaptation for the modern world unfortunatelym this sort of publicity a double—edged sword? were they better off with fewer of us knowing about them? i wouldn't say that. i would say that the fact that people are becoming more aware and we are talking today about pangolins can only be a good thing. there is already a massive trade, your report mentioned there were at least a million taken from the wild in the last ten years so there is already a fair degree of awareness on the traders‘ side but what we need to do is mobilise public opinion and the will to take action to try to address this. good of you to join us, thank you. susannah is here. in a moment she will be telling us what‘s hot and what‘s not in the business news. first a look at the headlines
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on afternoon live. theresa may faces the threat of another defeat in parliament on her brexit deal tomorrow, as tory pro—brexit mps threaten to revolt. lower energy and fuel bills lead to a fall in inflation. it was at 1.8% last month — its lowest level for two years. police say the deaths of three men in their 80s in exeter, two of whom were believed to be twins, are linked. a man‘s been arrested on suspicion of murder. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. uk inflation fell to 1.8% injanuary, the lowest level in two years according to the office for national statistics. it‘s also now below the bank of england‘s 2% target and has fallen from the five—year peak of 3.1% in november 2017 in the wake of the brexit vote. a fall in electricity, gas and other fuel prices was behind the fall in the headline rate. uk firms have accused the government of leaving them "hung out to dry" in the event of a no—deal brexit.
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with less than 50 days until the end of march, when the uk is due to leave the eu, the british chambers of commerce says 20 key questions remain unresolved. all flights to and from belgium have been cancelled due to a 24—hour strike by the country‘s main transport unions. air traffic control says they are unsure about adequate staffing levels. the strike, over wages, benefits and pensions, will also affect trains, buses and ports. we have stolen one of your stories, but about inflation but what is going on? we know that the headline rate of inflation has fallen down to 1.8% which means prices are still rising but slower than they were. crucially, rising slower than our wages are going up so we should feel a little bit wealthier. but what is happening... you are sceptical! it
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is really the drop in gas, electricity prices for example, there was that cap introduced which has had some kind of impact on the headline rate. a lot of people might not experience it because it is across the board, just an average for individual people but the rate is now below the bank of england‘s 296 is now below the bank of england‘s 2% target and we asked victoria clarke, an economist at investec, whether she thinks it will stay that way. what we're seeing here is that businesses want to avoid that messy and disorderly brexit on the of march but they are facing a double disadvantage. they don't know what the end of the political situation is going to be, what clarity looks like there but they cannot plan for ano like there but they cannot plan for a no deal scenario because they don't have the answers they need as we have highlighted with those 20 questions. all eyes will be on the bank of england as to how they respond? absolutely and we have another analyst who said that the
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chances of a uk interest rate rise we re chances of a uk interest rate rise were already galloping over the horizon as brexit uncertainty has put policymakers in a straitjacket and these inflation figures prove it is another reason for the bank of england policymakers to sit on their hands. we have mentioned brexit... but absolutely, we have covered it a lot on the programme, the warnings from businesses have come thick and fast, particularly over the last few weeks. they are really concerned about the impact of a no—deal brexit. today, ford is the latest firm to say it could have consequences for production here in the uk but it would be whatever it was necessary, we don‘t know what it is, to protect its business. also, the chambers of commerce, which has been quite vociferous about the concerns it has, has put out a detailed list of 20 questions that it says remain unanswered, ranging from kind of trade agreements will be in place with countries around
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the world, to whether employees will be able to move between the uk and the eu and they say these questions are crucial. i spoke to claire walkerfor more detail, the coexecutive the director of policy at the chambers of commerce and she explained that it really was necessary now that all of these questions were answered because it simplya questions were answered because it simply a lot of businesses are in the dark. talk about us china trade because that is never far from the headlines. no, and we have heard a lot about optimism, pessimism, whether or not there will be some kind of breakthrough in these talks. steve mnuchin, the us treasury secretary, has been in beijing and he said it was so far, so good. we can talk to michelle about what this means. we have heard this before, optimism followed by pessimism about the markets seem to think there could be some kind of breakthrough. for the second day in a row we have the dowjones industrial average up
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higherand a lot the dowjones industrial average up higher and a lot of that has to do with a sense of fear that perhaps a deal can be done and terrace can be avoided. this came after comments from donald trump suggesting perhaps the much first deadline could slide —— tariffs can be avoided. when donald trump and xi jinping called a truce and said there were three months for a deal to be negotiated, that expires on the 1st of march and after that, tariffs were due to go up after that, tariffs were due to go up from 10% to 25%. all along white house officials said that was a hard deadline but now there seems to be some wiggle room if they can reach some wiggle room if they can reach some kind of deal and that is why you are seeing this optimism. it matters for everyone because if you look at comments from the imf, they have said one of the headwinds facing the global economy is these us china trade talks. already there has been an impact with just the 10% tariffs. and with 25%, that could
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happen if there is no agreement reached between the us and china. what impact could that have for car production, for example? for cars it will be interesting to see. obviously one of the key things that happened when this trade dispute started with that certainly for americans trying to sell cars into the chinese market, there was a knock on effect because china put retaliatory tariffs on us cars and this was brought back in line to where it was before the dispute started when the talks began, that was one of the first steps are progress we saw between the two sides. the question is what next. it is beginning to hurt companies, we are hearing about the chinese economy slowing down and here we are hearing from people like apple, harley— davidson, happen! caterpillar, the sole industry or complaining if this is happen —— this is having a negative impact. are still sizeable issues remaining
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between the two sides and who is going to blink first when it comes to the demands of the americans have made on the chinese which is for some kind of structural change to their economy. you talk about that as far as their economy. you talk about that as farasa their economy. you talk about that as far as a structural change is needed for the chinese economy, that it is speculation about who will blink first because some say that it is china that is suffering the most at the moment. do you think that is the analysis of the a lot —— of a lot of the economists you have spoken to? we have certainly seen a slowdown in the chinese economy but what has changed since negotiations began is the position of donald trump. before the midterms he was in a very strong position and i think if you look at the government shutdown here in the us, that possibly weakened his hand among supporters and now the economy, people are slightly consent of a slowdown going into 2019 and that could also weakened his hand so how much political leverage does he have? maybe much political leverage does he have ? maybe not much political leverage does he have? maybe not as much as he had at
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the start of the talks. thank you very much, michelle. let's have a look at the markets. the ftse 100 has risen on optimism there could be this breakthrough michelle talked about. as we know, optimism then pessimism at but at the moment investors are quite optimistic from the noises coming out of beijing. denim group are on the board, the furnishing group. —— dunelm group. that is because their profit before tax rose 24% as sales rose particularly online. shares were up 3.2% but there was a note of caution with the chairman warning that going forward , with the chairman warning that going forward, the retail trading climate is likely to remain very difficult as we have heard from many other retails. thank you. treasure hunters in britain are finding more historic and significant artefacts than ever before. however, many don‘t end up in museums because of old and confusing definitions of what actually
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counts as treasure. but now new proposals are being put forward in an effort to keep important finds on public display, rather than being sold to private collectors. john maguire reports. scouring a field in pembrokeshire, it‘s as if mike smith has a sixth sense thanks to his sophisticated metal detector. basically it will give you a bad, a low, deep grunt if it‘s rubbish, so you don‘t dig it. if it‘s anything of interest, it will give you a nice tone. mike has been out most days since he was a young boy. have you seen on the horses, the old cart horses, where they had the lead peace over the eye? yes. that‘s what you‘ve got here. interesting, but worthless. last year, he made the discovery of a lifetime — many lifetimes, in fact — finding items that are more than 2,000 years old. they‘re decorations from the chariot of what is believed to be a celtic king. the items have been declared as treasure by the coroner
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and are now crown property. they could be worth a fortune. there is no two ways around it, you know? it‘s going to be a life—changing amount. it‘s a vindication proving that 42 years, i wasn‘t wasting my time. i‘ve had farmers around that i‘ve asked to go on their land and they‘ve said, "there‘s no roman or celtic activity here, mike, why are you wasting your time?" i knew it was here, ijust had to find it. further digs at the site, which is now protected by law, may reveal more artefacts, a find of national and international significance that‘s destined to remain in wales and on public display. but that‘s not always the case. this roman helmet found by a metal detectorist in cumbria was made of copper, not a precious metal, so not declared as treasure but which then sold to a private buyerfor £2.3 million. at the british museum, a team of experts controls the process of evaluating these historic discoveries. these roman coins here have none, or very, very little precious
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metal in them at all. someone discovers fewer than ten of these coins, but if they find ten or more, than they do have to report them as treasure. there were almost 1,300 treasure finds in 2017, a record number, and the government‘s concerned about what happens to valuable items. so, it‘s proposing changes in the law that include anything found and worth more than £10,000 will be officially protected by treasure status, regardless of the metal it‘s made from. if we think about the value of something, there have been some finds which we would have loved to see go in museums. we think the public would have benefited from being able to see these and study them but they've escaped outside of the system, they've gone to private collectors and maybe thinking about the value of them is a way to do that. back in pembrokeshire, mike smith tells me he supports the proposed changes,
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so once an item of historical and financial value is found, it will no longer be lost to the nation. john maguire, bbc news, pembrokeshire. time for a look at the weather with nick miller. increasing sunshine on the way in the next few days, already mild but getting milder but that said, still a lot of cloud around today. increasing sunshine this afternoon in east anglia and southern england, especially the south—east. from the cloud into the north—west of scotland, we will see some occasional outbreaks of rain. almost across the board, temperatures in double figures. we keep a good deal of cloud in northern england, northern ireland and scotland overnight, outbreaks of rain in north—west scotland and still quite windy as well but a range of temperatures, mild in north—west scotla nd temperatures, mild in north—west scotland but chile particularly in the parts of england and wales that
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are clear. the parts of england and wales that a re clear. low the parts of england and wales that are clear. low single figures and if you spot in the south east me stepping in below freezing. may some mist and fog to start the day but as the day goes on, sunshine breaking out more widely, even into scotland and northern ireland although some patchy cloud might remain and temperatures are one or 2 degrees higher. in friday, some days you could even see 16 celsius in the sunshine. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. today at 3: theresa may faces the threat of another defeat in parliament on her brexit deal tomorrow, as tory pro—brexit mps threaten to revolt. we cannot vote for this as it is currently configured because it rules out no deal and removes our negotiating leverage in brussels. lower energy and fuel bills lead to a fall in inflation. it was at 1.8% last month — its lowest level for two years. police say the deaths of three men in their 80s in exeter are linked — a man‘s been arrested on suspicion of murder. the home secretary tells the bbc he wants a crackdown
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on social media companies, which carry content that fuels knife crime. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. he has been called the best young player in german football. tottenham will see the extent of jayden sancho‘s talents in the champions league tonight. thanks, and we‘ll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. nick has all the weather. spring is in the air and temperatures are heading up. there is plenty of sunshine to, over the next few days. how long will it last? find out later on. thanks, nick. also coming up, the plight of the pangolin. rare footage of one of the world‘s most trafficked and endangered animals has been captured by scientists at chester zoo.
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there could be a significant delay if mps rejected her deal. today it also emerged an influential group of tory backbenchers who support brexit are threatening not to vote with the government in the commons tomorrow, amid reports they fear the government‘s motion could be used to prevent a no—deal departure from the eu. our political correspondent, nick eardley, has more. what will she do if she can‘t get her plan through parliament? at the moment, things around westminster are on hold as the government seeks changes over the irish border but with brexit just over six weeks away... questions to the prime minister! some are worried the government is simply running down the clock. the prime minister must stop playing fast and loose. businesses are begging for certainty. the economy is already suffering.
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prime minister, you have come to the end of the road. he can give businesses certainty by voting for the deal. that is what gives business certainty. bot coold an overheard conversation! it is very clear, the government's position is the same. we triggered article 50. in fact, this house voted to trigger article 50. that had a two—year timeline that ends on the 29th of march. we want to leave with a deal and that is what we are working for. tomorrow mps will hold a series of votes. there won‘t be a new deal on offer,
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but even endorsing what has leverage in brussels. tomorrow night would be voting againstthegoarantee shehas given in the commons for months. it is madness. it is a sign of how fragile truce in the conservative party is. without the backing of brexiteers, theresa may‘s majority is extremely vulnerable. a defeat tomorrow would only be symbolic but it would show once again just how volatile westminster is. so, it goes on. delicate conversations both home and abroad. the brexit debate is farfrom over, but leaving day gets ever closer. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. our chief political correspondent, vicki young, is at westminster. here we are, suggesting a possible
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defeat for theresa may na debate tomorrow. i have got a feeling of deja vu about all this. there will be a lot more debate tomorrow and some votes. the question is, what will they signal about where this process is going? there are certainly some unhappy brexiteers in the conservative party not willing to back that motion. we will have to see what other ideas mps put forward. what is it you want to put down as an amendment tomorrow and what are you hoping to achieve? lam told, and what are you hoping to achieve? i am told, and you would expect this to happen, that the civil service at the behest of the cabinet, has looked at the implications on trade and business, british business, if we we re and business, british business, if we were to leave the european union, crashing out without a deal. and diane told it does not mince its words and it makes it very plain that outcome would be disastrous —— and diane told. in the words of the
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business secretary, ruinous for british business if we leave without ideal. i want the government to publish that paper. it has been to cabinet. some members of the cabinet argued it should be published and it they were overruled. it is critical. my constituents, not just they were overruled. it is critical. my constituents, notjust business but everybody in my constituency, and of course across the country, has a right to know and understand the consequences of, i am sorry to say, theresa may's decision not to ta ke say, theresa may's decision not to take that calamitous outcome of the table, so people fully understand, including members of parliament but also your viewers, is constituents, to understand the full terrible situation we would be in if we crashed out without ideal. we keep hearing that lots of mps want to ta ke hearing that lots of mps want to take no deal off the table. they had the opportunity to do so and they could have another opportunity tomorrow but they are not taking that opportunity. what is going wrong? that is what we voted for. we
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had this cross—party amendment and voted with a bigger majority in favour of it than the so—called amendment. your viewers are now screaming out, what the hell does all this mean and they are right to be frustrated. but we voted to weeks ago against no deal. unfortunately, the prime minister refuses to be mandated by that. yesterday she told her she was mandated to go back to the european union to renegotiate the european union to renegotiate the backstop but unfortunately, she says there is no mandate for her to ta ke says there is no mandate for her to take no deal off the table. she can ignore it. mps need to do more if they need to —— if they want to stop no deal. you are absolutely right. one of the good things that has come out is because people have basically threatened to resign unless she accepted this thing which is parliament taking control of the situation. that will happen on
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february the 26th, 27. unless the prime minister comes back with some new deal which is put to a vote. we have got to get parliament in control of the situation. i want a series of outs, what we call indicative, meaningful votes that go through all the options, so that we get on with this nightmare and stop faffing about, so that we get the certainty that people are crying out for. my preferred option is that this matter goes back to the british people, so that we take this to them now that they know what brexit looks like and they have the opportunity, having had the negotiations, to vote for the original deal, also to have on the ballot paper, remain, because people are entitled to change their mind. young people are entitled to a say in theirfuture. mind. young people are entitled to a say in their future. there is not the majority for that in the commons at the moment. that is only because jeremy corbyn is not being true...
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lot of labour mps don‘t want another referendum. their party conference, they unanimously agreed that the peoples vote would take place when the other options had been dealt with. they have done that. and they lost the no confidence. we are not going to have a general election, thank god, because it would not solve anything. jeremy corbyn needs to be true to that vote at his co nfe re nce to be true to that vote at his conference and get on and make the case for a people's about. if he starts though that, there can be a majority because this is the only way through the impasse. majority because this is the only way through the impassem majority because this is the only way through the impasse. if theresa may runs the clock down and we end up may runs the clock down and we end up with a vote towards the end of march, can‘t use a situation where mps might fall in behind her deal? some may well do that but it is outrageous that this government, the party of business, is prepared to run down the clock in such a grossly
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irresponsible way, in the face of the knowledge that is contained within these documents of the disaster of a no—deal brexit for british business. it is disgraceful the party of business is even contemplating it. theresa may has got to stop that and be true to what a true conservative would believe in witches do the right thing for business. it needs to come off the table and then we need to go through the other options. in any event, we need to get this back to the british people. there is an impasse in this place and people are rightly fed up to the back teeth with it all. parliament cannot make the decision. let it go back to the british people and let them have the final say. thank you very much indeed. we will find out tomorrow which amendments have been selected by the speaker and which votes will happen tomorrow evening. inflation has fallen to its lowest level in two years. the consumer prices index, which tracks changes in the cost of living stood at 1.8% last month, compared with 2.1% in december. economists say the fall is partly due to cuts
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to energy and petrol prices. it means pay rises are now outpacing inflation, which as our economics correspondent andy verity explains, means many people may feel their incomes now go a little further. we are used to inflation prices fuelling inflation. the energy price cap played its part but so did cheaper crude oil. that has helped consumers such as melanie gee and jason sharples in bolton. as a sales executive, jason has seen his wages rise faster than prices for five years. other elements of the cost of living are getting more manageable and not less. petrol is cheaper than it was. it is still expensive and as a country we are charging too much for fuel, but petrol, i would say. i cannot think of much more that has gone a lot cheaper. certain foods.
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between december and january, gas bills fell by an average of 8.5% and electricity bills dropped by 4.9%. some of those bills may rise again in april, but for now they have helped give households a little more spending power. by seeing the real wage growth coming through with nine continuous months of increases in real wages and the last figure for a real wage increase being the highest rate of increase in the last ten years. pay rises have left behind house prices but now wages are rising faster. the weaker demand from around the world doesn‘tjust mean cheaper bills, it‘s also a sign of something else. the latest economic figures, the gdp numbers we had in the week, suggests the economy is in a softer patch. economic momentum has slowed. if it continues we could see a weakening in the labour market and that might put downward pressure on employment and it
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might lead to a downward pressure on pay grades. cheaper oil may have drug bills down and helped lift living standards but it is a by—product of the global, economic slowdown. the silver lining of better living standards is accompanied by a big, grey cloud. the pilot of the jet plane which crashed during the shoreham airshow four years ago, killing 11 people, has started giving evidence at his trial at the old bailey. andrew hill has been accused of manslaughter by gross negligence, but denies the charges. our correspondent sarah campbell is at the old bailey. this is the first time that andrew hill has spoken at all about the events of august 2015. he is in the witness box at the moment, dressed
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ina dark witness box at the moment, dressed in a dark suit and tie and really this is the outlining of the defence and most of today so far has been spent talking about his experience asa spent talking about his experience as a jet pilot. he is 52 years old, 54, iam as a jet pilot. he is 52 years old, 54, i am sorry. thejury were as a jet pilot. he is 52 years old, 54, i am sorry. the jury were told he was recruited by the raf straight from university. he was in the top two or three of his group and ended up two or three of his group and ended up instructing other pilots. he saw active service in iraq in 1993 and 1994. he was patrolling the no—fly zone there. and he wrote a award—winning computer programme around safety concerns for the harrierjack. he then worked for virgin atlantic and then british airways, where he was a captain at the time of the crash back in august 2015. the prosecution‘s contention was it was his negligent flying which caused the crash and although he was a careful and competent pilot, he had taken risks in the
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past, this is what the prosecution have said. addressing that issue this morning, the barrister said it has been suggested by the crown you we re has been suggested by the crown you were in some way a cavalier or thrill—seeking pilot, what do you say about that accusation? andrew hill replied, i would say i was probably one of the least people that applied to. there are ways to be cavalier, some people are and i believe i took a very structured and disciplined approach to display flying. did you ever intend to cause risk to anybody at an airshow question mark andrew hill said, absolutely not. the primary aim of the display was to avoid risk. this afternoon he has been describing videos that were taken of him displaying at air shows in shannon and brayjust displaying at air shows in shannon and bray just a displaying at air shows in shannon and brayjust a couple of months before the surer may show. they have been seeing the loop that went tragically wrong on august the 22nd
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2015. he has not yet got onto the specifics of what happened on the 22nd of august but the jury have already been told to expect his defence will be that during the display, he was somehow being affected by g force, which basically is the effect of g force, causing blood to rush away from the brain and he is saying that effectively impaired his ability to fly the plane and that is what happened. his defence continues and he denies all the charges against him. a man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after three men in their 80s, two of whom were believed to be twins, were found dead in exeter. devon and cornwall police have confirmed they are linking the deaths, which they described as ‘an unprecedented event.‘ a short while ago superintendent matt lawler, from devon and cornwall police, gave a statement to reporters. so we can confirm today that devon and cornwall police are treating the deaths of three men in exeter as
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murder investigations. the bodies of three men were discovered in two properties in exeter this week and these investigations have been linked. a man has been arrested in connection with the discovery of these scenes and is currently in custody in exeter. we were called at 3pm on monday the 11th of february to an address in bonn hay road, following the discovery of a body of a man within a private address. the man, aged 80 years, was confirmed deceased at the scene. enquiries remain ongoing to inform his next—of—kin. at one o‘clock on tuesday the 12th of february, we we re tuesday the 12th of february, we were called to a property in calais claim after the discovery of two bodies of men aged 84 years of age. both were again confirmed deceased at the scene. their next of kin have
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been informed. later on tuesday, the 12th of february, we arrested a 27—year—old male on suspicion of murder and he remains in custody at this time. based on our current information, we have yet to establish a connection between the parties involved. i know that this news will cause significant and understandable concern and given what is an unprecedented event in our city, which has shocked us all. i know that everyone‘s immediate concerns will be for the family and friends of the gentleman involved in this incident. and as you would expect, we are providing as much support as we possibly can. the investigation is being led by our major crime investigation team, supported by local detectives, forensic staff, family liaison officers, and an extensive range of
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other specialist staff who have been working round—the—clock since monday lunchtime. residents in the area will continue to see police codons throughout the day today and in the coming days, as we continue our work. the local neighbourhood team have been out on foot and will be out on foot patrols for the next two days, in order to provide advice, support and answer any questions or concerns of local residents. whilst a man has been arrested on suspicion of murder, we must keep an open mind and avoid speculation, as we are still at the very early stages of what is already a complex investigation. you‘re watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: theresa may faces the threat of another defeat in parliament on her brexit deal tomorrow — as tory pro—brexit mps threaten to revolt. lower energy and fuel bills lead to a fall in inflation. it was at 1.8 per cent last month — its lowest level for two years
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police say the deaths of three men in their 80s in exeter, two of whom were believed to be twins, are linked. a man‘s been arrested on suspicion of murder. and jayden sancho has been labelled the best young player in german football, heading into prussia documents match with tottenham hotspur in the champion league tonight. anthonyjoshua make his american debut in june. tonight. anthonyjoshua make his american debut injune. the world heavyweight champion will fight at madison square garden. and west indies bowler shannon gabriel wellness four internationals following a homophobic comment. i‘ll be back with more of those stories. ajury has been hearing evidence in the trial of a 16—year—old boy accused of raping and murdering a young schoolgirl on the isle of bute last year.
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the body of six—year—old alesha macphail was found in woodland last july. the accused, who cannot be named for legal reasons, denies the charges and has lodged a special defence blaming the death on the girlfriend of alesha‘s father. our scotland correspondent lorna gordon is at glasgow‘s high court. yes, robert macphail is partner tony mclachlan, who is 18 and was giving evidence here, told the court this afternoon that she loved alesha to pieces. she said the last time she had seen a six—year—old is one she had seen a six—year—old is one she had gone into a room to turn off a dvd. she said the little girl was sleeping. she said when they discovered she was missing the next morning and went to search for her, she could not believe anything bad had happened because she said, i know rothesay on the island beauty isa know rothesay on the island beauty is a safe place, i have stayed there all my life but later that moment ——
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morning, alesha‘s naked body was found on the grounds of a derelict hotel. the prosecuting qc asked her in court, did you have anything to do with the murder of alesha? she replied, no, and also told the court that along with alesha‘s father, she had sold and supplied cannabis to the 16—year—old accused of alesha‘s murder. the 16—year—old denies abducting and raping alesha last july and claimed it was miss mclachlan who killed alesha. she was askedif mclachlan who killed alesha. she was asked if she had a relationship with the accused. she said no, she was askedif the accused. she said no, she was asked if she met the 16—year—olds in my alesha disappeared, she said no. she was asked if she had taken ales ha she was asked if she had taken alesha from her room that night and planted evidence on her, murdered her. to all three questions, she a nswered her. to all three questions, she answered no. this afternoon, we
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heard from some of the police officers involved in the early stages of the investigation. one told the court how they had attended the accused‘s house after his mother made a phone call to the police in the early hours after alesha was found. she showed the police footage from cctv at her house and they then took a witness statement from the 16—year—old and described him as very confident and cooperative. the accused said in his statement that the police had been called because his mother had found his behaviour suspicious. they took details of what he had done in the hours around alesha‘s disappearance and he said he had left the house that night to buy cannabis and denies all the charges. the trial at the high court in glasgow continues. pangolins are protected by international wildlife laws but they remain the most trafficked group of mammals in the world.
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conservationists from chester zoo are conducting the first ever study of the giant pangolin sub—species. rare footage has now been captured, as helen briggs reports. a rare glimpse of the secret life of the mysterious giant pangolin. baby clings to mum on a ride through the forest, and a grown—up tries to climb a tree. when scientists from chester zoo studied pangolins in the forests of uganda, they were amazed to see what happens after dark. and they say the race is on to protect the most trafficked animal on earth. illegally hunted for their meat and scales, smuggling is on the rise. there have been tons of pangolin scales intercepted recently, including this haul confiscated in uganda. and wildlife experts say we may have lost a million pangolins from the wild in the past ten years alone. pangolins are solitary, nocturnal, they‘re quite elusive, often found in dense forests and historically we haven‘t known
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a huge amount about them. however, what we do know is that they are being traded really heavily, that all its species are vulnerable and threatened with extinction, and if we don‘t take action soon, that we could lose them. for the giant pangolin of uganda, this is one place they can‘t be poached. protecting rhinos around—the—clock is keeping these mysterious scaly mammals safe, too. and it‘s opening up a completely new window into their behaviour in the wild. helen briggs, bbc news. scott wilson is the head of field programmes at chester zoo which has been working to help moniter pangolin numbers in uganda. good afternoon. how worried are you by what does seem to be a striking thing that this is the most
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endangered mammal in many ways because of this huge demand from china? extremely worried. the number of seizures that are occurring on the amount of scales within those is quite staggering actually. it was 2018, there was about 20 tonnes seized. this year already... 20 tonnes of pangolins? yes, it is a lot of animals. my word! they believe is these scales and some of the meat does have value. certainly for the scales, it is keratin. it is the same as your fingernails and hair, and there is no evidence it has any medicinal value. how bleak is the outlook at the moment for this mammal? looking at the amount of seizures that are happening at the moment which are going up and
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up, the volumes of animals that must be involved in that, it must be having a massive impact and the risk is we don‘t really know how many animals are out there because they are so elusive and shy, we don‘t know the information. you are working in uganda and finding them almost by mistake. you were working on the plight of other animals? this is it. we were looking for other species in uganda. we found them when we were looking for others. it has come from those findings. how do you stop the demand because frankly while that is still there, you have got a problem, haven‘t you? while that is still there, you have got a problem, haven't you?m while that is still there, you have got a problem, haven't you? it is hugely challenging. it is a massively culturally entrenched belief. it is a massive population involved with it. it is going to ta ke very involved with it. it is going to take very significant behaviour change, campaigns, and also it will
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ta ke change, campaigns, and also it will take some legal measures as well. we need better enforcement and better laws to protect the species. there are not many mammals in the world at the moment where if you are asked to draw one, you would not have a clue until you had seen this report! they are quite unique in the way they look. that is the sad thing is well. some people don‘t know what it is or what it looks like and we could be losing them within a generation. within a generation? it is possible we lack —— the amount of animals that are disappearing, it is a matter of time. it is difficult to put into words how you feel when you hear something like that, when you know this is down to human beings and this misconception that human beings have. yes, it is devastating. and you see these videos of seizures with bags and bags of scales and you know that mounts up to hundreds of thousands of animals. they are
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already very rare. it is quite shocking. it is really good to talk to you. thank you very much for your time this afternoon. all the headlines coming up very shortly but let‘s catch up firstly with the weather. increasing sunshine on the way over the next few days. it is already married but it is getting milder. there is still a lot of cloud out that today. increasing sunshine this afternoon through east anglia and into southern england. especially the south—east. into the north—west of scotland, we will see some occasional outbreaks of rain. almost across—the—board, temperatures in double figures. a good deal of cloud overnight. in north—west scotland, some outbreaks of rain and quite windy. a range of temperatures. really mild. the odd mist and fog patch to start the day. as you can see, sunshine, breaking
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out more widely, even into scotland and northern ireland. some patchy cloud may remain an temperatures a degree or to hire. into friday, we could even see 16 celsius in the sunshine. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... theresa may faces the threat of another defeat in parliament on her brexit deal tomorrow as tory pro—brexit mps threaten to revolt. we cannot vote for this, as it is currently configured, because it rules out no deal and removes our negotiating leverage in brussels.
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lower energy and fuel bills lead to a fall in inflation. it was at 1.8% last month — its lowest level for two years. police say the deaths of three men in their 80s in exeter, two of whom were believed to be twins, are linked. a man‘s been arrested on suspicion of murder. sport now on afternoon live withjohn watson. tottenham face dortmund later in the champions league and it‘s a young englishman who could pose the biggest threat to spurs? .no . no doubt he has a big, big future in front of him. totten will have to keep a close eye on him. they have a couple of big names missing themselves. a lot of praise forjoe root. action
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has been taken. yes, shannon gabriel will mess 41 day international is against england following comments he made in the final test. he was charged for breaching the code of conduct. they did not say exactly what he said, whether or not it was a homophobic slur, but based onjoe root reaction, he said don‘t use it as an insult, it is ok to be gay, the presumption is it was. it is his reaction that was commended by many people in and outside of the game. i think that sums up how far sport has moved. and i think for him, he has moved. and i think for him, he has shown real characteristics of leadership, being a role model in that scenario, to really kind of stand up for what he believes in. we don't know what gabriel said butjoe root has really shown a positive light. anthonyjoshua is set to fight in
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america for the first time as the world heavyweight champion. it has been announced in the last hour he will defend his wba, wbo and ibf titles against american jarrell miller on the 1st ofjune in madison square garden in new york. joshua, still undefeated, last fought in september when he beat the russian, alexander povetkin, at wembley. it is not the fight many would have hoped to see but with deontay wilder and tyson fury set for a rematch, joshua was running out of options. there has been a huge shock at the welsh open snooker with masters champion judd trump being welsh open snooker with masters championjudd trump being knocked out by world number 72 duanejones in the second round in cardiff. trump has been the form player this season but struggled against his welsh opponent and lost the match 4-2. as welsh opponent and lost the match 4—2. as we have heard, racing has resumed following a six day
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suspension after the equine flu outbreak. free entry was awarded at musselburgh. this was the first race at plumpton. trainers and staff had to follow strict criteria at all the courses as the british horseracing authority looked to limit its spread further. in rugby, england have released joe cokanasiga and dan robson back to their premiership clu bs to robson back to their premiership clubs to play this weekend, both of whom are recovering from injury. they have been given the chance to play in what is a rest weekend in the six nations. england head coach eddiejones ain‘t a 25 man training squad which will meet today for three days of camp before next saturday‘s big match with wales —— named his squad. that is all for now, i will have more at around 4:30pm. it once held vast swathes of territory in syria and iraq, but now the so—called islamic state group‘s last few hundred fighters are confined to a handful of tiny enclaves. around the town of baghuz in syria, they‘re surrounded by the us—backed
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coalition, who‘ve launched what they‘ve called the final battle against the militants. richard galpin reports on what‘s expected to be the imminent fall of islamic state‘s last significant bit of land. these us—backed fighters are now poised for victory over so—called islamic state here in eastern syria. since the weekend, civilians have been pouring out of the last tiny sliver of territory still held by the militants in the country. and, with most civilians now having left, the offensive which began on saturday can now be wrapped up. on the ground, syrian democratic forces are battling about 500 or 600 experienced islamic state fighters who are making a last stand. translation: there are two factors that have a direct
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impact on this battle. one, the terrorists there are the finest fighters from different nationalities including europeans, afghans, pakistanis and iraqis. they are all professionals who have past experience in other terrorist groups including al-qaeda, and they are also defending their last position. but the united states air force is also playing a key role, bombing what is left of the militants‘ territory, and that is reportedlyjust two streets in one small hamlet called baghuz. at its peak about four years ago, islamic state held swathes of territory in syria and iraq but this has diminished as us coalition and russian—backed forces have hit back at the militants in a sustained campaign. the caliphate has now shrunk to just the tiny enclave of baghuz. the isis leader, abu bakr al—baghdadi, here announcing the creation of the caliphate in 2014, is reported to have been seen in the baghuz area several
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months ago before apparently moving into the desert. for the civilians who managed to get away from the fighting in baghuz, there will be relief they are safe. but this is not the last gasp of islamic state. it remains a threat, with cells in many countries still capable of carrying out attacks. richard galpin, bbc news. social media companies should be made to take more responsiblity for cracking down on content that‘s fuelling knife crime, the home secretary has told the bbc. sajid javid says he wants measures to ensure technology firms clamp down on gang—related material, in the same way they have targeted terrorist propaganda. newsbeat‘sjim connolly reports. more people are being killed in england and wales by knives now that at any time since the second world war.
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rob was in a gang in east london but moved away to escape his violent past. he spent six years in prison, but now goes around schools and colleges to try to stop others making the same mistakes. i started carrying a knife when i was 12. a knife because everyone was doing it at the time. i wanted to fit in. i stabbed quite a lot of people. and if i was to sit here and count, i wouldn‘t be able to count, because there was so much years i was in the gang life, and people remind me to this day about people i stabbed i didn‘t remember, you know? that‘s the god‘s honest truth. the first person to be killed by a knife this year died on this street in the early hours of new year‘s day. knife crime is becoming a grim daily reality. and the government knows it needs to do something about it. just down the road at kings college hospital, the home secretary has come to see where victims end up. one of the ways he wants to stop people getting to this point is by restricting content that incites violence, like some drill music, a genre of highly aggressive
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rap often linked to street violence. i actually think you can do a lot more to police harmful content on the internet. at the moment we don't have that legislation for it. i have the legislation for terrorist content, i have it for illegal child sexual abuse imagery, but we don't have that legislation today for that kind of content. and we're changing that. as a parent, i want my children to be able to walk around on any street and just feel that they are safe and that's why a lot more needs to be done life is looking brighter for robert. but many people he grew up with are trapped in a gang lifestyle. back in my day, if i listened to drill music, i‘m riding out 24/7. like, if i was listening to drill music every day, the way it is now, i‘m definitely committing crime. it‘s not helping. they‘re doing acts of people dipping and stabbing each other. that‘s not... that‘s glamorising and that‘s wrong. preventing more getting involved is the new priority for the authorities. jim connolly, bbc news. earlier i spoke to blaen roberts,
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the founder of liver pedlaa pool, an organisation that helps to steer youths away from criminal activity, gang culture and knife crime through cycling activities and workshops. i started by asking him how much the problem is really driven by social media. it is glamorising that lifestyle and that gang culture and that is what you need to target before you target knife crime. you need to target why these lads are getting into that lifestyle, why they are getting into the gang culture because it is hard to get out of it once you get into it. but that is what you need to do, you need to prevent these knife crime incidents and tragedies before they actually happen and take place because i believe the police cannot invest their way out of this problem. it has got to be solved at the root source which is targeting this gang culture and gang lifestyle. but how much of that... you talk about glamorising it through social media, how many people are being introduced, brought into that gang culture because what they have seen on social media? well, there is not a lot of opportunities for these lads
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so they are going to the streets and this gang lifestyle, this gang culture, it is appealing to them, making money is appealing to them. it is easy for them to get into the wrong crowd and get roped into that lifestyle. what i‘m doing with liver pedlaa pool in liverpool is giving them opportunities to get away from that lifestyle and create a healthy lifestyle. that is what we‘re doing here. we have set up liverpool‘s first mountain bike team and we are competing all across the uk this year. we are giving lads opportunities who are videographers, photographers, and it is about giving them a new path in life and new opportunities and a whole new lifestyle to get them away from the gang culture and the knife crime epidemic that is here in the uk. blaen, how much of the problem here is because... what you offer is the chance for younger people to get out and get into another postcode, how big a deal is that? i know it sounds silly but that is an issue, isn‘t it? of course.
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in may, when i set up liver pedlaa pool, the aim was to break the postcode barriers here in liverpool because it is something that has never been done before. postcode barriers, a lot of the knife crime issues and a lot of crime stems from postcodes. getting the lads and the youth away from their own postcodes into new postcodes, into the big city, what liverpool is, and even the bigger country that the uk is, getting them out of their postcodes is a big thing. some breaking news. we are getting news from derby crown court that a man has been found guilty of killing and mugging a 100—year—old woman in derby. he has been found guilty of robbery and manslaughter. the man stole her handbag last may and severely injured her in the process. she died from pneumonia days later which was brought on by the
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injuries. she survived the horrors of the nazi prison camps and chose to make her home in derby but 100—year—old zofeejo katzan‘s life was fully ended by an attack, and the man responsible was arter vaskovitch, a man desperate for cash to get his next drug fix. it was late mayjust before nine o‘clock in the morning. zofeejo katzan was making her way to church. she was approached by arter vaskovitch from behind who knocked out of the ground and snatched her handbag from her with such force that he ripped off the handle and he left bleeding on the road. she had suffered multiple injuries including a fractured cheekbone and neck. her
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friend visited her in the nursing home afterwards. she was a total mess, it was just terrible to see. she couldn‘t lift her arm or feed herself. it was terrible. i was feeding her by spoon because she was in sucha feeding her by spoon because she was in such a bad state, she could not lift her arms and she was in a state of shock, how could someone have done this to me? arter vaskovitch fled the city but was caught after the handbag he stole was found. it had the fingerprints on receipt inside. a frail and vulnerable woman killed for a nasty drug habit. arter vaskovitch will be sentenced tomorrow. we will get the latest from our reporter when she has more on that conviction. you are watching
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afternoon live. young celebrities and sports stars are to be banned from taking part in gambling adverts. the new rules are being introduced in an effort to protect children from adverts that could otherwise encourage them to gamble. the rules cover social media and online platforms and come into force in april. the advertising standards authority will be able to ban any adverts which break the new rules, as zoe kleinman reports. a recent study by the gambling commission found that the number of children classed as having a gambling problem had quadrupled in the last two years. it classed 450,00011 to 16—year—olds as regular betters — more than those who had taken drugs, smoked or taken alcohol. despite strict rules about how gambling firms can advertise, there were regularly examples of those which slipped through the net. 13—year—old mattie follows an influencer on youtube who recommended a mystery box game where players pay to open a box and don‘t know what they will win. it felt more like a game than an actual gambling website. i saw there was a box where you could actually win a gaming pc, which are really expensive,
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like thousands of pounds. and my first reaction was, i want that. using his debit card, he spent his birthday money hoping for a big prize. i won a key ring and a pot of slime, which probably would have been worth £5 in total. under the new standards, gambling operators will have to check that most of the followers of any social media influencers they work with are aged over 18. sports stars aged under 25 are also banned from appearing, along with certain animated characters from tv and film. the committees of advertising practice say it is online ads that need this new boost of regulation. this rule has been in place for quite a considerable length of time and the industry is well used to the fact there is a cut—off point. they shouldn't be using individual to maybe have that youth appeal, you know, a professional footballer who has sort of burst on the scene. i think we don't see a massive amount of it,
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however, where we do, we take action. the gambling industry will have to tread a fine line when promoting itself, especially on the internet with the age—old ad viewers can be difficult to pinpoint. zoe kleinman, bbc news. susanna is here and will have more on that when she brings us the business news but first the headlines. theresa may faces the threat of another defeat in parliament on her brexit deal tomorrow as tory pro—brexit mps threaten to revolt. lower energy and fuel bills lead to a fall in inflation. it was at 1.8% last month — its lowest level for two years. police say the deaths of three men in their 80s in exeter, two of whom were believed to be twins, are linked. a man‘s been arrested on suspicion of murder. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. inflation has fallen from the five
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year peak of 3.1% in november 2017 and is below the bank of england 2% target. a fall in electricity, gas and other fuel prices was behind the fall in the headline rate. uk firms have accused the government of leaving them "hung out to dry" in the event of a no—deal brexit. with less than 50 days until the end of march, when the uk is due to leave the eu, the british chambers of commerce says 20 key questions remain unresolved. ford has said a no—deal brexit would be catastrophic for the firm‘s manufacturing operations in the uk and that it would do "whatever is necessary" to protect its business. the comments come after a report the carmaker was stepping up preparations to move production out of the uk. let‘s pick up on that report, tougher rules on advertising, were
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talking about young people and gambling. you might have thought that white are young teenagers advertised to buy gambling firms. it seems that they are because a recent study showed that 450,011 to 16—year—olds regularly gamble. that‘s concerned the committees of advertising practice — which set ad rules — and so it‘s making the rules a lot stricter. from the 1st of april there will be a ban on the use of animated and licensed characters from film and television, as well as celebrities who "appear to be" under the age of 25. gambling operators will also have to ensure that the majority of the audience of any social media influencers they work with are over 18. that might be quite difficult to try to ensure that. joining us now is andrew taylor from the committees of advertising practice — which is the sister body of the of the advertsing standards
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authority. this is going to be difficult to enforce, making sure that audiences are over 18. the new standards that we published are designed to ensure that operators understand what they have been required to do for some years now. what we are expecting from them, and this is where the asa importers against them, is that they should be able to demonstrate they have done their diligence to ensure that those who should not be targeted by gambling ads, those whose exposure to them should be appropriately reduced, are not included in audiences. it seems to bea high included in audiences. it seems to be a high figure, the number 711 to—year—olds already gambling. how are they able to? —— the numbers of 11 to 16—year—olds. are they able to? —— the numbers of 11 to 16-year-olds. it is a big numberand it 11 to 16-year-olds. it is a big number and it comes out from a study carried out by the gambling commission and you will find the majority of that tends to be around activity is not regularly advertise, things like playing cards with friends or a lottery scratch cards.
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nevertheless, it is still a concern. that is why we have published these standards and why we are trying to ensure that we are getting it right when protecting children from the potential harms to do with gambling advertising. it is there concern in particular for example at football supporters groups? for example, if betting firms advertise on certain football clu b betting firms advertise on certain football club websites, that inadvertently they are advertised to as well? there is. very recently the asa and the committees of advertising practice took action, writing to the football league is to remind them that part of websites which are for youth teams or youth supporters groups for instance should not be a place where you put gambling advertising. how are you going to enforce this or how will the advertising standards authority do so? it seems that you will have to police an awful lot of sites will stop the asa receives around 30,000 complaints a year so there is a
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pretty good pick up in terms of problems that consumers are seeing and we also work closely with the gambling commission as the regulator in the sector to ensure we are able to get purchase with operators when we find a problem and make them change problematic advertising. andrew taylor, thank you very much. now, tell me about sausage world. this is part of an expansion by a food company which is expanding their factory production in yorkshire. they are going to include a visitor centre and apparently you will be able to see a machine producing 1300 sausages per minute. i‘m told is like a gatling gun. producing 1300 sausages per minute. i'm told is like a gatling gun. they think people are going to stay and watch this? they are expecting a lot of school trips, maybe even hen parties. are you sure?! somebody is telling porkies! it is part of the
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expansion plan, it is a good success story for the firm, heck foods which isafamily story for the firm, heck foods which is a family run firm. i suppose they wa nt to is a family run firm. i suppose they want to explain how they are doing it and achieving their success. now i know! let's talk about the markets. moving on from sausages and the ftse100... it is sizzling! up 1% and following on from markets in the us yesterday and asia today, there is optimism there could be a deal reached between china and the us to avoid the huge tariffs threatened. good sales figures also for dunelm group, up more than 3%. thank you. you‘re watching afternoon live but let‘s get more on that breaking news. a man has been found
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guilty of mugging a 100—year—old woman. tell us what has happened. guilty of mugging a 100—year—old woman. tell us what has happenedm took thejuryjust over woman. tell us what has happenedm took the jury just over two woman. tell us what has happenedm took the juryjust over two hours to reach the verdict. they found arter vaskovitch guilty of killing the 100—year—old woman and mugging her in may last year. she was going to church, he came up on the ground dash mecca behind her and posted to the ground, snatched her handbag and left her bleeding on the floor. her name was zofjia kaczan. she has quite an eventful story, spending time in the nazi prison camps in the second world war. today there has been an outpouring of support from the polish community here saying that what happened to her is incredibly sad. after she was attacked, she had a fractured
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cheekbone. she was taken to hospital, her neck was also hurt and days later she died from pneumonia. that pneumonia stemmed from the injuries she sustained in the attack. today a jury unanimously reached the verdict of guilty on two counts, the murder of zofjia kaczan and also mugging her on that day last may. thank you very much. let's get a look at the weather and let me tell you first what is happening at 4:20pm because we have a special weather forecast that involves a blue peter presenter but i can say no more. nick miller will be along later. we have a rather big surprise, it will be a big surprise to the blue peter presenter because they will have to do the weather forecast and they are not too happy about it! but that is still to come, let‘s have a look at the weather for now with nick miller. increasing sunshine for the next
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couple of days, temperatures heading up couple of days, temperatures heading up even further than where they are now and it is already mild but not everybody has the sunshine. this was earlier today in cornwall. what is clear is that wherever you are in the uk, we are bringing up this warmerair the uk, we are bringing up this warmer air from the uk, we are bringing up this warmer airfrom the south the uk, we are bringing up this warmer air from the south and that is what we will find ourselves in. with increasing sunshine. but the sunshine this afternoon mainly in east anglia and southern england, a good deal of cloud elsewhere. the odd shower here and there but especially some patchy rain in north—west scotland. it‘s quite windy in the western isles, these are average speeds, gusts up to 50 mph going into tonight. temperatures almost across the board in double figures. that said, they will drop away where it is clear overnight, particularly in parts of england and wales. a lot of cloud in north wales, the north midlands, northern england, northern ireland and
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scotla nd england, northern ireland and scotland and some outbreaks of rain in western isles, north—west scotla nd in western isles, north—west scotland and the northern isles. a range of temperatures, where you have the cloud, the temperatures stay up and it could be nine or 10 degrees in the western owls but with clearer skies, frost on the way for some “— clearer skies, frost on the way for some —— in the western isles. maybe even below freezing in the countryside. the same flow of air coming in tomorrow but a drier aspect to it which means less cloud. still some in scotland and northern ireland but less compared to today. some sunny spells and any early rain in the northwest will push away to the north and increasing sunshine across england and wales. many of us will have blue skies as the afternoon goes on and temperatures won or 2 degrees higher 14 or even 15 degrees. —— one or 2 degrees. plenty of sunshine on friday, some cloud in the west of northern
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ireland and the western isles and north—west scotland with some outbreaks of rain. still quite breezy but possible we could see 16 celsius in northern scotland or north—east wales as we go through the day. temperatures come down slightly going into the weekend, a bit more cloud but it is still mild for that time of year. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. today at 4: theresa may faces the threat of another defeat in parliament on her brexit deal tomorrow, as tory pro—brexit mps threaten to revolt. we cannot vote for this as it is currently configured because it rules out no deal and removes our negotiating leverage in brussels. a man is found guilty of killing and mugging a 101—year—old woman in derby, who died after her handbag was stolen. lower energy and fuel bills lead to a fall in inflation. it was at 1.8% last month — its lowest level for two years. the home secretary tells the bbc he wants a crackdown on social media companies, which carry content
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that fuels knife crime. coming up on afternoon live all the sport withjohn watson. yes, he has been called the best young player in german football. but none will see the extent of his talents when they play in the champions league tonight. —— totte n ha m champions league tonight. —— tottenham hotspur. and nick miller has all the weather. are you ready for spring? we are going to boost the sunshine and the temperatures. spring is in the air and the full forecast is coming. thanks, nick. also coming up — the plight of the pangolin. rare footage of one of the world‘s most trafficked and endangered animals has been captured by scientists from chester zoo. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. theresa may has insisted she wants the uk to leave
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the european union with a deal on the 29th march. it follows a report her lead brexit negotiator was overheard suggesting there could be a significant delay if mps rejected her deal. today it also emerged an influential group of tory backbenchers who support brexit are threatening not to vote with the government in the commons tomorrow, amid reports they fear the government‘s motion could be used to prevent a no—deal departure from the eu. our political correspondent nick eardley has more. what is on theresa may‘s mind? what will she do if she can‘t get her plan through parliament? at the moment, things around westminster are on hold as the government seeks changes over the irish border but with brexit just over six weeks away... questions to the prime minister! some are worried the government is simply running down the clock. the prime minister must stop playing fast and loose. businesses are begging for certainty. the economy is already suffering. prime minister, you have come
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to the end of the road. he can give businesses certainty by voting for the deal. that is what gives business certainty. but could an overheard conversation in this brussels bar give a hint about strategy? itv news reports the pm‘s chief negotiator, ollie robbins, said the government might have to seek a significant delay to brexit day if it cannot get a new deal through parliament in the next few weeks. notwithstanding brussels barroom chatter, will the prime minister rule out a delay of brexit beyond march the 29th? it is very clear, the government's position is the same we triggered article 50. in fact, this house voted to trigger article 50. that had a two—year timeline that ends on the 29th of march. we want to leave with a deal and that is what we are working for. tomorrow mps will hold a series of votes. there won‘t be a new deal on offer, but even endorsing what has already been backed by parliament isn‘t easy.
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tory brexiteers might not back the government. we cannot vote for this as it is currently configured because it rules out no deal and removes our negotiating leverage in brussels. if the prime minister went through the lobbies for this tomorrow night would be voting against the guarantee she has given in the commons for months. it is madness. it is a sign of how fragile truce in the conservative party is. without the backing of brexiteers, theresa may‘s majority is extremely vulnerable. a defeat tomorrow would only be symbolic but it would show once again just how volatile westminster is. so, it goes on. delicate conversations both home and abroad. the brexit debate is farfrom over, but leaving day gets ever closer. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. our chief political correspondent, vicki young, is at westminster. those five words, and so it goes on.
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yes, we have been saying that for quite a while. it looks as if the real action is pushed towards the end of the month. they will be a debate tomorrow and i will be some fa u lts debate tomorrow and i will be some faults but i don‘t think anyone thinks they are going to be terribly significant. if we look at what labour are calling for, there will be an amendment in the name of jeremy corbyn saying that by the 27th of february the government must either bring forward another meaningful vote, a vote on any kind of deal that theresa may has managed to bring back from brussels, or make a statement saying there is no longer any kind of agree deal and they have to bring forward some of they have to bring forward some of the kind of motion but of course what labour is calling for is a much closer arrangement, a closer trading relationship with the eu, they want to be ina relationship with the eu, they want to be in a customs union but they also want crucially to have a say over any trade deals that the eu might be doing. many people think thatis might be doing. many people think that is pretty fanciful and the eu would not agree to that. it would
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involve a lot more negotiation but at the moment there are not many signs that theresa may is reaching out across the divide and offering that kind of thing. she is pursuing her deal with changes to the backstop, which of course many in her own party and the dup want, but many people feel that at the moment at least she is not willing to do that. there have been talks afternoon between the brexit secretary and david leddington, senior cabinet ministers, and six yea rs senior cabinet ministers, and six years to, who is the shadow brexit secretary. this is what he had to say after he came out of those meetings. we had frank and serious discussions, we set out the labour party position which are the two options of the close economic relationship and on the other a public vote. obviously, the question of the red lines came out. unless the red lines change, it is very difficult to make progress. it was against the backdrop of the prime
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minister running down the clock but they were frank and they were serious discussions. labour has its own tensions over this issue. he doesn‘t seem to think that a general election is very likely at this point. but of course is the preferred option, according to labour spokespeople this afternoon and at lunchtime. they feel they seldom need to pursue that but there doesn‘t seem to be much movement towards the idea of another referendum. the leadership seem pretty resistant to that and i think labour mps pretty resistant to that and i think labourmps are pretty resistant to that and i think labour mps are getting increasingly restless about all of that. they wa nt restless about all of that. they wantjeremy restless about all of that. they want jeremy corbyn to restless about all of that. they wantjeremy corbyn to really move and start calling for another referendum because i think they feel that time is running out. a man has been found guilty of killing and mugging a 101—year—old auschwitz survivor in derby. artur waszciewicz stole zofija kaczan‘s handbag last may and severely injured her in the process. she died from pneumonia days
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later which was brought on by those injuries. sima kotecha reports. she survived the horrors of the nazi prison camps and chose to make her home in derby. at 100—year—old zofija kaczan possibly has life was cruelly ended by a senseless attack. the man responsible, artur waszciewicz, a heroin addict who was desperate for cash so he could get his next drug fix. today a jury convicted him of robbing and killing her. it was late may, just before nine o‘clock in the morning, zofija ka cza n nine o‘clock in the morning, zofija kaczan was walking along here, making her way to church. she was approached from behind. artur waszciewicz knocked her to the ground and snatched her handbag from her with such force that he ripped off its handling the process and then he left her bleeding on the road. she had suffered multiple
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injuries, including a fractured cheekbone and neck. herfriend visited her in the nursing home afterwards. she was a total mess, it was just terrible to see. she could not lift her arm, she could not feed herself, it was terrible really. i gave her risks by spoon because she was in such a bad state. she was just ina was in such a bad state. she was just in a state of shock. how could somebody have done this to me? really. artur waszciewicz fled the city but was caught after the handbag he still had been found. it had his fingerprints on the receipt inside. a frail, vulnerable woman killed for a nasty drug habit. artur waszciewicz will be sentenced tomorrow. inflation has fallen to its lowest level in two years. the consumer prices index, which tracks changes in the cost of living, stood at 1.8% last month,
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compared with 2.1% in december. economists say the fall is partly due to cuts to energy and petrol prices. it means pay rises are now outpacing inflation, which as our economics correspondent andy verity explains, means many people may feel their incomes now go a little further. we are used to inflation prices fuelling inflation. the energy price cap played its part but so did cheaper crude oil. that has helped consumers such as melanie gee and jason sharples in bolton. as a sales executive, jason has seen his wages rise faster than prices for five years. other elements of the cost of living are getting more manageable and not less. petrol is cheaper than it was. it is still expensive and as a country we are charging too much for fuel, but petrol, i would say. i cannot think of much more that has gone a lot cheaper. certain foods.
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between december and january, gas bills fell by an average of 8.5% and electricity bills dropped by 4.9%. some of those bills may rise again in april, but for now they have helped give households a little more spending power. by seeing the real wage growth coming through with nine continuous months of increases in real wages and the last figure for a real wage increase being the highest rate of increase in the last ten years. pay rises have left behind house prices but now wages are rising faster. the weaker demand from around the world doesn‘tjust mean cheaper bills, it‘s also a sign of something else. the latest economic figures, the gdp numbers we had in the week, suggests the economy is in a softer patch. economic momentum has slowed. if it continues we could see
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a weakening in the labour market and that might put downward pressure on employment and it might lead to a downward pressure on pay grades. cheaper oil may have drug bills down and helped lift living standards but it is a by—product of the global, economic slowdown. the silver lining of better living standards is accompanied by a big, grey cloud. a man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after three men in their 80s, two of whom were believed to be twins, were found dead in exeter. devon and cornwall police have confirmed they are linking the deaths, which they described as ‘an unprecedented event.‘ a short while ago, superintendent matt lawler, from devon and cornwall police, gave a statement to reporters. i know that this news will cause
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significant and understandable concern, given what is an unprecedented event in our city, which has shocked us all. i know that everyone‘s immediate concerns will be for the family and friends of the gentle men involved in the incident. and as you would expect, we are providing as much support as we are providing as much support as we possibly can. the investigation is being led by a major crime investigation team, supported by local detectives, forensic staff, family liaison officers and an extensive range of other specialist staff who have been working around since monday lunchtime. the pilot of the jet plane which crashed during the shoreham airshow four years ago has started giving evidence at his trial at the old bailey. andrew hill has been accused of manslaughter by gross negligence, following the death of 11 people. he denies the charges. a woman, named by the accused in the murder of six—year—old alesha
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macphail, has denied being involved in her death. toni mclachlan was giving evidence during the trial of a 16—year—old boy, who denies abducting, raping and murdering alesha last july on the isle of bute. the teenager, who cannot be named because of his age, has claimed it was ms mclachlan who killed the six—year—old. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: theresa may faces the threat of another defeat in parliament on her brexit deal tomorrow, as tory pro—brexit mps threaten to revolt. a man is found guilty of killing a 101 year old holocaust survivor — who died after her handbag was stolen in derby. lower energy and fuel bills lead to a fall in inflation. it was at 1.8 per cent last month — its lowest level for two years. and in sportjayden sancho has been
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labelled the best young player in german football. shannon gabriel will miss four one day international is against england following comments made in an exchange with joe root in the final test in st lucia. and there has been a shock at the welsh open snooker. judd trump has been knocked out by the world number 72. social media companies should be made to take more responsiblity for cracking down on content that‘s fuelling knife crime, the home secretary has told the bbc. sajid javid says he wants measures to ensure technology firms clampdown on gang—related material, in the same way they have targeted terrorist propaganda. newsbeat‘sjim connolly reports. police siren more people are being killed in
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england and wales by knives now that at any time since the second world war. rob was in a gang in east london but moved away to escape his violent past. he spent six years in prison, but now goes around schools and colleges to try to stop others making the same mistakes. i started carrying a knife when i was 12. a knife because everyone was doing it at the time. i wanted to fit in. i stabbed quite a lot of people. and if i was to sit here and count, i wouldn‘t be able to count, because there was so much years i was in the gang life, and people remind me to this day about people i stabbed i didn‘t remember, you know? that‘s the god‘s honest truth. the first person to be killed by a knife this year died on this street in the early hours of new year‘s day. knife crime is becoming a grim daily reality. and the government knows it needs to do something about it. just down the road at kings college hospital, the home secretary has come to see where victims end up. one of the ways he wants to stop people
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getting to this point is by restricting content that incites violence, like some drill music, a genre of highly aggressive rap often linked to street violence. i actually think you can do a lot more to police harmful content on the internet. at the moment we don't have that legislation for it. i have this legislation for terrorist content, i have it for illegal child sexual abuse imagery, but we don't have that legislation today for that kind of content. and we're changing that. as a parent, i want my children to be able to walk around on any street and just feel that they are safe and that's why a lot more needs to be done life is looking brighter for robert. but many people he grew up with are trapped in a gang lifestyle. back in my day, if i listened to drill music, i‘m riding out 24/7. like, if i was listening to drill music every day, the way it is now, i‘m definitely committing crime. it‘s not helping. they‘re doing acts of people dipping and stabbing each other. that‘s not... that‘s glamorising and that‘s wrong. preventing more getting involved is the new priority for the authorities. jim connolly, bbc news. earlier, i spoke to blaen roberts,
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the founder of liver pedlaa pool — an organisation that helps to steer youths away from criminal activity, gang culture and knife crime through cycling activities and workshops. i started by asking him how much the problem is really driven by social media. it is glamorising that lifestyle and that gang culture and that is what you need to target before you target knife crime, you need to target why these lads are getting into that lifestyle, why they are getting into the gang culture, because it is hard to get out of it once you get into it but that is what you need to do. you need to prevent these knife crimes and knife crime incidents and tragedies before they actually happen and take place because i believe the police cannot arrest their way out of this problem. it has got to be solved at the root source, targeting this gang culture and gang lifestyle. but how much of that, you talk about glamorising it through social media, how many people are being brought into the
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gang culture because of what they have seen on social media? well, there is not a lot of opportunities for these lads, so they are going to the streets and this gang lifestyle, this gang culture, it is appealing to them, making money is appealing to them, making money is appealing to them. and it is easy for them to get into the wrong crowd and roped into that lifestyle and what i am doing in liverpool is giving them opportunities to get away from that lifestyle and create a healthy lifestyle and create a healthy lifestyle and create a healthy lifestyle and that is what we are doing. we have set up the first mountain bike team and we are competing across the uk this year. we are giving lads opportunities and it is about giving them a new path in life and new opportunities and a horny lifestyle to get them away from the gang culture and the knife crime epidemic that is in the uk —— a whole new lifestyle. how much of the problem is because what you offer is an opportunity for young people to get into another postcode.
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how big a deal is that? one of course, in may, when i set it up, the aim was to break the postcode barriers because it has never been done before. and the postcode barriers are a lot of the knife crime issues and a lot of the crime stems from postcodes, so getting the lads and the youth away from their own postcode into new postcodes, into the big city, what liverpool is, and even the bigger country that the uk is, getting them out of their postcodes is a big thing. the police and the public are being exposed to increased risk, because more frontline police officers are having to work alone, that‘s the warning from the police federation which represents officers in england and wales. more than three—quarters of frontline officers — who responded to a survey — said they were "often or always" on duty by themselves. it was also found that most had experienced stress and anxiety during the past year. jon donnison reports. officers on a raid in sheffield, targeting organised crime.
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police work is often stressful, dangerous and traumatic. pc daniel gaunt developed ptsd after joining the police aged just 23. i‘d had 23 years of life where nothing really traumatic had happened. and then in a very small space of time i‘d been exposed to things i didn‘t even know existed, let alone that i would have to deal with. today‘s survey says he is not alone. 79% of officers say they have had feelings of stress and anxiety in the past year. 62% say they have had a traumatic experience in the last 12 months. and 90% say the police are understaffed. that increasingly means officers are having to work on their own. pc mickjohnson was stabbed in the arm after
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confronting a man with a knife in hartlepool in 2017. he too has ptsd. he was working alone. we are more on our own during the daytime, certainly. and occasionally on nights due to the lack of staff. that is the be all and end of it. if there is enough of us to be double crewed on night shifts, we are double crewed. if there isn't, one of us will be single crewed. we have seen sustained cuts to policing. 18% of the workforce is gone. and we have the same level of demand, if not more, for certain types of crime. and a reduced pot of officers to deal with that. the only way you can make ends meet is putting officers out on their own, trying to deal with the 999 calls. police! the number of police officers in england and wales has fallen by more than 20,000 since 2010. but in a statement, the government said it took the well—being of police officers and staff very seriously... police! ..and have invested £7.5 million in a new police well—being service. jon donnison, bbc news.
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pangolins are protected by international wildlife laws but they remain the most trafficked group of mammals in the world. conservationists from chester zoo are conducting the first ever study of the giant pangolin sub—species. rare footage has now been captured, as helen briggs reports. a rare glimpse of the secret life of the mysterious giant pangolin. baby clings to mum on a ride through the forest, and a grown—up tries to climb a tree. when scientists from chester zoo studied pangolins in the forests of uganda, they were amazed to see what happens after dark. and they say the race is on to protect the most trafficked animal on earth. illegally hunted for their meat and scales, smuggling is on the rise. there have been tons of pangolin scales intercepted recently,
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including this haul confiscated in uganda. and wildlife experts say we may have lost a million pangolins from the wild in the past ten years alone. pangolins are solitary, nocturnal, they‘re quite elusive, often found in dense forests and historically we haven‘t known a huge amount about them. however, what we do know is that they are being traded really heavily, that all its species are vulnerable and threatened with extinction, and if we don‘t take action soon, that we could lose them. for the giant pangolin of uganda, this is one place they can‘t be poached. protecting rhinos around—the—clock is keeping these mysterious scaly mammals safe, too. and it‘s opening up a completely new window into their behaviour in the wild. helen briggs, bbc news. let‘s get more on that breaking story, the conviction of a mugger, he failed a 101—year—old woman in a
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street robbery. this is the case of artur waszciewicz. let‘s hear from the police. the evidence in this case created a jigsaw that when pieced together showed no one else could have carried out this attack. we presented cctv and mobile phone evidence to prove that artur waszciewicz was there at the time of the attack. evidence that he had stopped and got out of his car and that his behaviour afterwards showed he was hiding something more serious than simplyfinding he was hiding something more serious than simply finding a handbag. the saddest aspect of this case is that an otherwise healthy lady has lost her life. this man —— so that this man could satisfy his selfish desire for easy money. zofija kaczan was
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well—known and thought of in her community and all those who knew her are devastated by her tragic death. on behalf of the crown prosecution service, i would like to offer my sincere sympathies to all those close to zofija kaczan. being on dt at the —— on the date of the incident, i have been involved from the very start. as part of the individual investigation team which saw evidence being gathered, which included speaking to witnesses, medical professionals, as well as members of the public. they were all very helpful in writing information to the police. also, the council staff who were collecting the fly—tipping on the moment —— morning who played a vital role in this investigation and found the handbag. many long shifts will work by office rs many long shifts will work by officers in the initial days and this involves officers coming to work on their days off and working throughout the night. this dedication did not stop. numerous office rs dedication did not stop. numerous officers worked tirelessly and
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determined to induct a thorough and fair investigation. the investigation included many hours of cctv and ensuring we got the right people and the right suspect. on the day of charge, there was a lot of evidence to reveal. getting those charges through proved a difficult task. as more evidence was required, office rs task. as more evidence was required, officers willingly went out of their routine to get this important and vital evidence so the cps could review it. persisting and prioritising tasks finally got the charges which has led to the trial in court. this has been an emotional case and has touched the community and those involved in the investigation. having attended the initial incident through to the funeral, it is difficult not to be caught emotionally involved. —— becoming. my role was to gather the
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evidence but hearing the stories from friends and the community, it creates very sad circumstances. working forjustice for zofija ka cza n working forjustice for zofija kaczan has always been the aim for me and the investigators involved. i am sure we all know someone in the community, whether that be a parent orgrandparent, and who community, whether that be a parent or grandparent, and who is vulnerable. i think it is fed to say that this crime has affected people from all over the community, members of the public as well as police officers. putting in aside and concentrating gathering what was required in evidence had to remain the priority. as a member of public and a serving police officer, i am disgusted that this shocking crime has been committed. artur waszciewicz was from the same community as zofija kaczan but to commit this crime against any member of society is a problem. what adds to the severity of this is that the crime was committed against a 101—year—old woman who was not able to defend herself and was going
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about her business as she did everyday. she would have been so acce pt everyday. she would have been so accept —— an expectant of what was going to happen to her. for artur waszciewicz to then carry out —— deny carrying out those actions, he showed no remorse towards the victim in this sad case ensuring the evidence was... resulted in the case getting to try and the result that we see now. on behalf of the police and the prosecution team, we are extremely pleased with the result. the determination everybody has put in has paid off. we did not expect any less of a result and now artur waszciewicz will have to pay the price for this horrendous crime we aren't teen knows he has committed. we feel that some justice has been found and the... zofija kaczan will be missed by many and i hope some closure can now be had after today's
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result. i was on duty on the 28th of may 2018 and remember these events very well. i remember a call coming over the radio and i rememberfeeling shocked and sickened hearing the message being passed. an elderly lady had been brutally attacked and robbed on this road in derby. the response was overwhelming. every just wanted to help. the time of the incident, we knew very little about what had happened. the only thing she was able to tell is at the scene was that she had been struck from behind, knocked to the floor and her handbag ripped from her arm. she had not seen her attacker. at this stage of the investigation, we had very little to go on, no suspects, or witnesses to the attack. we very quickly establish the police needed the help of the community and appeal was launched helping —— asking members of the public to help us find the person responsible for this horrific crime. i can honestly say that the response from the community to assist in this investigation has
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been overwhelming. zofija kaczan was 100 years old and an active, independent lady who lived a happy life in derby. her passion in life was church, there was never a day that went by when she did not go to church. one of her proudest moments was when she received a letter from the pulp after celebrating her 100th birthday. she was known and loved by all members of the community and considered by many as a grandmother figure with a heart of gold. she lived through the devastation of the warand lived through the devastation of the war and sought some horrific things in her lifetime, even forced to work ina in her lifetime, even forced to work in a concentration camp and separated from her family. in a concentration camp and separated from herfamily. on in a concentration camp and separated from her family. on the days prior to her tragically passing away, she was told her attacker had been arrested. there was a genuine sense of relief and closure for her knowing we had arrested the right person. close friends of mrs kaczan told the police she had even prayed for her attacker before she passed away and that was the kind of person she was. having attended her
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funeral, speaking to those who knew her and learning a lot about her life, i felt i her and learning a lot about her life, ifelt i knew her and learning a lot about her life, i felt i knew her personally. at times it has been difficult not to let emotion take over due to the sensitive nature of the case and when i can say that everything possible line of enquiry was followed and no stone was left unturned. it is myjob however to remain professional and ensure that this despicable crime was thoroughly investigated and brought before the court. the tragic circumstances that have led to the death of mrs kaczan and the appalling crime committed by mr waszkiewicz had not only shocked and upset me personally but dedicated officers that have worked so hard in this case, not to mention her friends so hard in this case, not to mention herfriends and so hard in this case, not to mention her friends and members of the church. this has literally touched the hearts of everyone. i would like to say a genuine heartfelt thank you to say a genuine heartfelt thank you to everyone that has made this result possible. these include the members of the public who came forward with information, local residents that have allowed us into the home to obtain crucial cctv, the
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street cleaners who located mrs kaczan‘s and back and inform the police which proved critical in the enquiry. we will pull away from that news conference. it is to do with that horrific case. some details we have not heard before, that the victim, who eventually died of her injuries, zofija kaczan, was told by police before she died that her attacker had been arrested. she actually prayed for him, as you heard, before she died. that was the sort of woman she was, was how police described her. we will have more on that distressing case from derby crown court throughout the afternoon here on bbc news. you‘re watching afternoon live. now time for a very special weather forecast and your forecast is radzi. thank you, simon, doing it forthe
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blue peter badge. spring has officially sprung according to sue from oxfordshire who is a weather watcher. the snowdrop showing spring is just around the corner. it has been dry and dry today but moving through the evening, we can see a band of rain coming from the west which will firstly affect the north—west of scotland with rain and drizzle and then dissipate through scotland. it will also bring with it quite mild temperatures, especially this time of year, eight or 9 degrees and moving across england and especially in the far east in norwich, take care if you are on the roads. that weather front stays west fortu nately for roads. that weather front stays west fortunately for us and as it moves along, it brings double—digit highs also aren‘t talking about unseasonable highs which is fantastic for those of us who like ita fantastic for those of us who like it a bit warmer. 13 degrees, 12 degrees, also in scotland. the
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average maximum temperature for this time of year in england would be 9 degrees and just six in scotland. mike dunn dhoni and mother will be very pleased, and so will carol kirkwood because in the murray firth you could expect 14 degrees. thank you could expect 14 degrees. thank you very much. thank you! nick miller has walked out because he‘s out of a job! you had better explain because you and lindsay from blue peter have been here and you had a competition as to who could do it. he was the best meteorologist. it turned out they couldn‘t find one so they wrote to me in! we have had carroll and tom and they have massively helped us. one thing i have to say, i have nothing but respect for anybody who stands there because i‘m sweating here! respect for anybody who stands there because i'm sweating here!l respect for anybody who stands there because i'm sweating here! a lot of the viewers watching, not necessarily watching blue peter, i find that odd! but tell me the process , find that odd! but tell me the process, what was the idea? what we
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like to do on blue peter is teach people to soft learning so rather than being dictatorial, it is entertaining. maybe if you don‘t like geography or sciences, this is applied science so if you‘re good at it, it could be a future job for you. and maybe you could earn something. if you don‘t mind, can i come a bit closer? you come over here. thank you very much. this is a moment! if my mum is watching, she will be so proud. she should be because for your fantastic service to bbc news you have your very own blue peter badge. look at that! you need to go and stand back that.” will shake your hand. that is marvellous, all i‘m hearing in my it is what on earth has he done to earn a badge! let‘s bring in nick miller. tomasz schafernaker a badge! let‘s bring in nick miller. tomasz schaferna ker and carol kirkwood were teaching you earlier. i don‘t want to get his head too big but it‘s not easy because you just
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have a picture of yourself. it really is a challenge and i don‘t really is a challenge and i don‘t really understand what i‘m saying whereas you guys are meteorologists so you know it and you can condense it and make it more digestible.” so you know it and you can condense it and make it more digestible. i am in or. you did a fantasticjob and i worry when i see somebody doing such a good job of it! they have been wanting to get rid of me for a long time! can ijust say, no autocue as well! that‘s not the case. time! can ijust say, no autocue as well! that's not the case. not everybody realises it, we are basically looking at the camera but we have our weather graphics and we can see ourselves but we don't have any words. we remember that. can see ourselves but we don't have any words. we rememberthat. i can see ourselves but we don't have any words. we remember that. iwas entertained watching you behind—the—scenes before you came on doing what every weather presenter does, standing there and talking to themselves waving their arms around because they are practising because thatis because they are practising because that is the way the words stick. and when you gesticulate and add in geography, not all the cities are there, you don‘t want to be the person who calls the wrong city and
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all that goes on! it has been a pleasure, thank you for having us.” will stop this love in! good to see a professional, radzi, thank you! thank you very much. we will have the headlines and also our regular look at what is happening in the regions coming up in a moment. good afternoon. the 18—year—old footballerjadon sancho good afternoon. the 18—year—old footballer jadon sancho has good afternoon. the 18—year—old footballerjadon sancho has been labelled the best young player in german football heading into the russier dortmund‘s champions league match with tottenham. steffen freund, who played for both clubs, made the claim. he moved to germany to boost his playing opportunities from manchester city, he has done sold there and earned an england call—up and his team—mates are aware of his reputation. i feel a bit responsible, or responsibility for keeping him on the ground because i know we are here in england and you
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are world famous for hyping your own players! we try to keep him on the ground because no doubt he has a big future in front of him. the west indies bowler shannon gabriel will miss for one—day internationals against england following comments he made in the final test. he was charged by the icc for breaching the code of conduct. they did not say if it was a homophobic slur, but based on the reaction ofjoe root, when he said it is ok to be gay, the presumption is that it was. it was joe root‘s reaction on the field which has been commended.” joe root‘s reaction on the field which has been commended. i think it sums up how far sport has moved but also for him, he showed real characteristics of leadership, being a role model in that scenario, to stand up for what he believes in. we don‘t know what gabriel said but from joe root‘s perspective, he has really shown a positive light. heavyweight boxing champion anthony joshuais heavyweight boxing champion anthony
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joshua is set to fight in america for the first time. it has been announced he will defend his wba, wbo and ibf titles against american joelle miller on the 1st ofjune in madison square garden —— jarell miller. it is not the fight that many hope to see but with deontay wilder and tyson fury set for a rematch, he was running out of options. a big shock at the welsh open snooker, masters championjudd trump has been knocked out by world number 72 duane jones. trump trump has been knocked out by world number 72 duanejones. trump has been the form player this season but struggled against his welsh opponent, losing the match 4—2. that is all the support for now, plenty more on our website including news of the west ham midfielder declan rice‘s position to pledge his international football to england having already won three senior caps
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for the republic of ireland. but we have more throughout the afternoon. now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to carol malia in the north east, where a school has pledged to support the local high street in a pioneering loyalty scheme. i will be finding out about that in a moment. and annabel tiffin is in the north west, where the first electric passenger trains have started running from bolton into lancashire, after a delay of more than two years and a lot of disruption to passengers. carol, you ve got a story about how the power of social media has helped a local business in harrogate. it certainly is. a small local book shop called imagined things had a terrible day trading last year and i‘m sure many shops in towns and city centres feel the same way but
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this book shop tweeted it had a grand total in the takings from the date of £12 34 p. it put it out on social media and the response was that a parent of a pupil at ashville college, an independent school, put it to the attention of the headmaster and amazing things happened after that. we don‘t hear from the headmaster now. we were inspired by a tweet she sent out that she had only managed to bring injust over £12 so that she had only managed to bring in just over £12 so we that she had only managed to bring injust over £12 so we met that she had only managed to bring in just over £12 so we met with that she had only managed to bring injust over £12 so we met with her to see if she would be willing to meet with us and supply us with our books. since doing that, she has helped us resource one of our libraries and next year she will help supply all of the books for the prizewinners. could this be the first of many? let's hope so because potentially that is 2500 customers right off the bat. the school has launched a loyalty card provided to
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staff, pupils, former pupils, so thatis staff, pupils, former pupils, so that is a great market for that book shop. and if we can get others to join in, that is brilliant. really it isa pr join in, that is brilliant. really it is a pr blinderfor the join in, that is brilliant. really it is a pr blinder for the college and a book shop but i find it quite ironic ina and a book shop but i find it quite ironic in a way that the internet, the world of shopping, which was partly blamed for the demise of the highest rates, and here it is proving a knight in shining armour in this case. there will be a lot of communities watching it. plenty more on the programme tonight. do you have a blue peter badge? my children have a blue peter badge? my children have a blue peter badge? my children have a badge, and you just got given one! it wasn't for nothing! your a nswer one! it wasn't for nothing! your answer then was no! thanks, carol. hi, annabel. these trains, electric and brand—new but very late. they are, as you said, two years is a long time to wait for a train. in their defence,
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this was a huge project involving widening tunnels, remodelling tracks and platforms and laying 236,000 metres of cable but when it was originally meant to be completed in december 2016, and then december 2017, and now it is onlyjust happening, you can see how long people have had to wait. it has been repeatedly pushed back, network rail said the original delay was caused by lessons learned from other electric vacations, in other words testing and delivery took longer than expected. they have also been problems installing overhead wires and then they scrapped the original partners, balfour beatty, and opted for carillion and we all know what happened to them. all this contributed to that huge disruption that we saw on the trains last summer. loads of cancellations, replacement bus services. the electrification did not happen in time for those timetable changes and northern says the knock on what they had less time to prepare for new
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routes, drivers were not trained leading to shortages. really, it led to so much disruption and now people are happy at last to see that they have started. they started on monday so has it gone to plan?” have started. they started on monday so has it gone to plan? i suppose it is only wednesday so we don‘t want to speak to soon! but they are running at the moment on the manchester to preston line which is known locally as the bolton collar door. network rail says it will revolutionise travel in this part of the world, they are quicker trains and more reliable and should be able to travel at up to 100 mph. at the moment, not all of the trains on the route are electric but more will be introduced throughout the year. network rail said they were sorry for all the chaos this has caused four passengers, they thanked people for their patients but, as you said, will the passengers be happy? i am sure they will tell us if they are not. i am sure they will.
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thanks, annabel. more on that tonight on bbc north west tonight. do you have a blue peter badge? my co—presenter, roger does. do you have a blue peter badge? my co-presenter, roger does. of course he does, goody two shoes! thank you both very much. if you would like to see any on that on any of those stories. and mind that we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm here on afternoon live. there‘s been a lot of focus recently on the brexit—related drama playing out in westminster and brussels. but how does all this uncertainty affect eu citizens living in the united kingdom? we already know that they will have to apply for a new settled status after brexit, allowing them to continue living in the uk. kasia madera has been discussing brexit with one of the most prominent members of the polish community in the uk. damian wawrzyniak has cooked for the british royal family,
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promotes polish fine dining, and is close to getting his first michelin star. soon after the referendum, he opened a restaurant in peterbrough, in cambridgeshire, which voted to leave the eu. so, has he changed his mind about making the uk his home? this country cannot be run without immigrants. so, we are building this country, together with the english, and we should work as one nation, not against each other. i can‘t go. it took me 14 or 15 years to build what i have now, and the more beautiful things will start, and more beautiful things would happen. so, i can‘t reallyjust leave this country because of some stupid referendum, you know, or some settlement status. ok, it‘s not nice to be asked twice to apply, and i said i will not apply, and i will not pay the fee. i didn‘t pay the fee, and the fee was scrapped, so, it‘s worth the wait! obviously, i have this kind of love,
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to find food and good wine, and obviously do something which nobody can do, and serve food in a way that it looks interesting, and the polish grandmother would come, close their eyes and eat and they would say, oh, my god, this is polish food, it doesn‘t look like polish food! you were quite vocal about the settled status. you said you are not paying the £65. that has since been scrapped. are you going to apply for this? well, you see, what is the difference between a work permit i applied to legally work and live in the uk compared to the settlement status which gives me the right to legally live and work in the uk? what‘s the difference in two different projects? so, you actually opened your restaurant just after the referendum result. what were you thinking about? to be honest with you, the last two years were the most successful yea rs in my business, ever. so, we grow, the restaurant is busy, the consulting is growing, everything is fine. i don‘t know — if you don‘t want to be successful, you can moan. you‘re not packing up then? no, i‘m staying, i need
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to cook more lamb! susannah is here. in a moment she will have all the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. theresa may faces the threat of another defeat in parliament on her brexit deal tomorrow as tory pro—brexit mps threaten to revolt. a man is found guilty of killing a 100—year—old holocaust survivor who died after her handbag was stolen in derby. lower energy and fuel bills lead to a fall in inflation. it was at 1.8% last month — its lowest level for two years. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. uk firms have accused the government of leaving them "hung out to dry" in the event of a no—deal brexit. with less than 50 days until the end of march when the uk is due to leave the eu, the british chambers of commerce says 20 key questions remain unresolved. and ford has said a no—deal brexit would be catastrophic for the firm‘s manufacturing operations in the uk.
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house price growth slowed to its lowest pace sincejuly 2013, last year, as uncertainty weighs on the housing market. all flights to and from belgium have been cancelled due to a 24—hour strike by the country‘s main transport unions. air traffic control says they are unsure about adequate staffing levels. the strike, over wages, benefits and pensions, will also affect trains, buses and ports. let‘s talk about the latest warnings from businesses, about a no—deal brexit particularly. they have come thick and fast in the past few weeks and today ford said it could have a catastrophic impact on its business. it said it would do whatever it ta kes to it said it would do whatever it takes to maintain its business and safeguard the company‘s interest. we
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heard from the british chambers of commerce who have warned before about the concerns they have. they have put out a lot more detail saying there are 20 key questions that remain unanswered, everything to do with eu workers‘ rights and also tariffs and what kind of countries that you whale —— uk will be able to trade with post brexit. they say that all of them remain unanswered. earlier i spoke to claire walker, the coexecutive director of policy for the british chambers of commerce. what we are seeing is that businesses want to avoid that messy and disorderly brexit on the 29th of march but they are facing a double disadvantage. they don't know what the end of the political situation is going to be, what clarity looks like, but they can't plan for a no deal scenario because they don't have the answers they need as we have highlighted with those 20 questions. that was claire walker. interestingly, we have also heard from a leading economic german think tank. it said
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that german businesses were already suffering because of the uncertainty surrounding brexit. it has called on the eu to offer concessions to the uk. how is it?! yes, including removing the backstop and instead proposing a provisional agreement that would keep the eu and the uk in a joint customs territory even after 2020. that is a leading german think tank. they are saying there are already problems for german firms. talking domestic, inflation has risen sharply. it has done but now it has fallen back below the 2% target of the bank of england, down to1.8%. it target of the bank of england, down to 1.8%. it is because of drops in the price of fuel and gas and electricity in particular. although prices are still rising, they are rising slower than wages are rising so in theory we should be feeling better off. obviously not everybody does, it is an average. it has an
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impact on what will happen with interest rates. does it tie the hands of policymakers at the bank of england? james bevan is at ccla investment management so what are the prospects of a rate rise in the medium term? more unlikely given these numbers? mark carney has said that the principal challenge for him is what happens with brexit and he has gone as far as saying he does not know if he wants to hike rates or cut them depending on the outcome so that is uncertain. what we do know is that some of the reduction in prices that we would have observed feeding through to the reduced rate of inflation are going to reverse. so the cap on the standard variable energy rate is going to change back for 15 million households in april, that will be reported in a number, and therefore we should inspect inflation numbers to begin to tick up from that source. the big wild card is what happens to exports from china, which
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has been back to exporting lower prices which has fed through to lower global price inflation. if that continues, prices can stay low. that is what the markets are keeping an eye on the us china trade talks in particular to find out if there is going to be a breakthrough. if not, there could be 25% tariffs put on around $250 billion worth of goods and that could have a global impact. it certainly could and steve mnuchin, the treasury secretary, is out in basic negotiating and he went so faras to out in basic negotiating and he went so far as to say today that talks we re so far as to say today that talks were going quite well. we know that mrtrump and the were going quite well. we know that mr trump and the chinese president, xijinping, mr trump and the chinese president, xi jinping, both like a deal. i suspect that they may grab some sort of deal that they will not actually address the fundamental long term issues of this agreement. and finally, let‘s talk about whitbread because it is expanding its share buy—back programme but why?m because it is expanding its share buy-back programme but why? it sold
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costa coffee so it has cash available and it has worked out it would rather hand it back to investors via a repurchase of shares than paying a dividend or investing in the business. this is a really contentious global issue. in the states, buy— backs have contentious global issue. in the states, buy—backs have been an immense driverof states, buy—backs have been an immense driver of increased earnings per share but ney says it is —— sate is all about giving executives more money. executives say it is about the right size business for the future environment but what they are not doing investing for a stronger better tomorrow. james bevan, thank you very much. a quick look at the markets. the ftse100 is up as well, optimism in the breakthrough of the us china trade talks and you can see the dax in frankfurt as well as the pound against the europe. thank you very much. ijust want pound against the europe. thank you very much. i just want to pound against the europe. thank you very much. ijust want to say pound against the europe. thank you very much. i just want to say you should have earned your blue peter badge. you don't know what was going
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on behind—the—scenes! that‘s it from your afternoon live team for today. next, the bbc news at five with huw edwards. time for a look at the weather. increasing sunshine on the way over the next few days, it is already mild but getting milder. that said, still a lot of cloud today, just increasing sunshine this afternoon in east anglia and into southern england, especially the south—east. from the cloud to the north—west of scotland, we continue to see some occasional outbreaks of rain. almost across the board, double figure temperatures. we keep some cloud in northern england, northern ireland and scotland overnight with some rain still in north—west scotland and still quite windy but a range of temperatures, mild in north—west scotla nd temperatures, mild in north—west scotland but fairly chilly, particularly in parts of england and wales that are clear. low single figures and a few spots in the south—east below freezing. maybe some mist and fog to start the day but as you can see, as it goes on, sunshine breaking out more widely,
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even into scotland and northern ireland but some patchy cloud might remain and temperatures are a couple of degrees higher. on friday, some places could even see 16 celsius in the sunshine. good afternoon, you‘re watching bbc news at 5. the headlines: the prime minister denies that she is forcing mps to back her deal or face delays and brexit. theresa may faces the prospect of another defeat in parliament on the bigoted vote tomorrow as some conservative mps are fitting to rebel. we cannot vote for this as it is currently configured because it rules out no deal and negotiating leverage in brussels. we'll have the latest from westminster with just 44 days to go before britain is set to leave the eu. the other main stories. inflation has fallen to 1.8%, the lowest level for two years. in nine has been arrested on suspicion of murder following the death of the men in their
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